Special Course Topic Archive

Fall 2015

690-163W: Information Analytics (Rajasekar) 3 credits
Pre-req: INLS 560 or equivalent. The data explosion experienced by computerization of every aspect of our lives from social media to internet of things requires a deeper look at information analytics. The course introduces proven and emerging analytical techniques that can be used to deal with mountains of mostly unstructured data. We will look at several analytical paradigms from Predictive Modeling to Data Mining, Text Analytics to Web Analytics, Statistical Analysis to novel paradigms in Map Reduce and Storm, and from Crowd Sourcing to Scientific Workflows.  Knowledge of programming is essential.

690-172: Usability Testing and Evaluation (Capra) 3 credits
This course will introduce central concepts in usability engineering, testing, and evaluation. These include: UX lifecycle, interaction models, contextual inquiry, modeling and task analysis, rapid evaluation and inspection techniques, UX goals and metrics, formal and informal evaluation techniques, usability moderation, test plans, testing environments, analysis, and reporting.

690-187: Information Assurance (Hassell) 1.5 credits, meets October 19-November 30
This course is a broad introduction to information assurance. It deals with aspects of data integrity, privacy, paper and human security issues, and security from several perspectives: legal issues, technical tools and methods, social and ethical concerns, and organizational policies, procedures, and standards. Students who complete this course will be able to identify security issues for corporations and non-profit organizations, and create appropriate policies and procedures documents for an organization.

690-207: Community Archiving (Anthony) 3 credits
Prerequisite: INLS 556.  A number of archivists are advocating for a new, collaborative model of archiving that empowers communities to look after their own records “by partnering professional archival expertise with communities’ deep sense of commitment and pride in their own heritage and identity.”  This class will explore the many ideas and issues surrounding this new model by working with a local community group to develop a comprehensive strategy for collecting, describing and maintaining their historical records in both analog and digital formats. The work will be informed by discussion of relevant literature and examination of other community archiving projects.

690-220: Disaster Planning for Libraries (Flaherty) 1.5 credits, meets October 13-December 1
Disasters can come in a variety of forms (e.g. hurricanes, floods, fires, tornadoes, ect.) and strike at any time. Preparedness, prevention, and planning are all critical components of effective disaster responsiveness. In this course, students will learn about disaster prevention, recovery, training, and outreach as they apply to the library setting.

690-224: Visual Analytics (Gotz) 3 credits
This course will provide an overview of Visual Analytics, a topic that combines information visualization and data analysis to support analytical reasoning via highly interactive visual interfaces. The course will review foundational concepts, recent results, and commonly used technologies. The course is project-oriented and will require that students program their own web-based visualization systems using HTML and JavaScript. While no specific courses are considered pre-requisistes, students should be competent programmers. Prior experience with web programming (e.g., HTML and JavaScript) is strongly recommended.

690-228: Project Management (Nguyen) 1.5 credits, meets October 12-December 2
This course presents a practical, minimalistic approach to project management that will provide students with the necessary strategies and skills to effectively manage generic projects.  The course integrates project management theory, based on the Project Management Institute’s A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), and with exposure to project management best practice through required lectures, readings, case studies, and different organizational perspectives. Assessment, practice and development of project management skills will be accomplished through individual participation in class and individual assignments, and also through team assignments that include the development of written documents, diagrams, presentation and peer evaluations.

690-240: Everyday Life Information Practices (Thomson) 1.5 credits, meets October 2-November 20) 
This course explores theoretical and empirical literature regarding the information practices of ordinary people in everyday life (i.e., “non-work”) contexts. It also touches upon the methodological approaches used in such research, as well as the deciphering of what is ‘informational’ in any setting. Topics considered include: (1) contextual elements (e.g., life worlds, stocks of knowledge, norms, values) shaping patterns of information practices in the everyday; (2) use of newspapers, radio, television, the Internet, and non-conventional media to meet information needs; (3) information practices arising from problem-driven/compromised and pleasurable/leisure-related everyday life situations (e.g., health, parenting, diversity, and hobby pursuits); (4) barriers to information access and information poverty; and (5) public libraries and other institutional providers of everyday life information; techniques for investigating and presenting information practices in/from ‘the field.’

690-241: National Archives: Politics, Memory, and Public History (Ahmed) 1.5 credits meets October12-December 2
Suggested prerequisite: INLS 556, Introduction to Archives and Records Management, or an equivalent course. This course explores the theoretical, social and material construction of national archives. The creation of public memory in national archives will be examined from an international perspective, looking at examples from several countries. Using case studies, it will take into consideration the role political ideas and movements  (anti-colonial, for example) have played in determining what is included in (and what is excluded from) national memories and archival collections. It will also discuss the critique of national archives launched by the community archiving movement.

890-235: Health Informatics Seminar (Travers) 1 credit

Spring 2015

INLS 089-001 First Year Seminar: Social Movements and New Media (Tufekci)
 

Movements ranging from uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and beyond to “Occupy” protestors in the United States have been using new media technologies to coordinate, to organize, to intervene in the public sphere as well as to document, share, and shape their own stories. Using a range of tools from Facebook to Twitter, from satellite modems to landlines to ad-hoc mesh networks, these movements have made their mark in history.

The objective of this course is to enhance our conceptual and empirical understanding of the interaction between the new media ecology and social change. We will explore various approaches to studying social movements and social change and look at specific cases.

Governments and powerful institutions are also responding to the challenge posed by the emergence of the Internet as a mundane and global technology. From increased surveillance and filtering capacity, to delivering propaganda over the Internet to their own, from “hacking” of dissident websites to sophisticated methods of censorship, governments around the world are broadening their repertoire of social, technical and legal tools for control and suppression of --and through-- the Internet.

We will explore the integration of new media tools within these movements as well governmental and institutional responses to these developments. We will also discuss the rapidly changing and contested terrain for shaping the infrastructure of global connectivity. Materials for this class will include readings, videos (not to be viewed in class but as material to be viewed), and a variety of visiting speakers (both in person and via Skype). (3 credits)

INLS 089-002 First Year Seminar: Smart Cities (Rajasekar/Rademaker)

 

A smart city is one where the needs of a populace meet the needs of environmental sustainability. The balance between the social and environmental issues is governed by Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) that power a smart city infrastructure. In this course, we learn about the influence of urban networks, smart city urban planning, energy as a catalyst of sustainable development, smart city infrastructure, sustainable transportation, flow of information and communications, smart grids, digital infrastructure and the role of data and information technology. We will discuss criteria for measuring the smartness of a city, including quality of life, citizen governance, and discuss issues that go towards the making of a future smart city. Several case studies will be presented with guest lecturers invited to present on critical thinking and practices in smart city development. (3 credits)

690-163: Information Analytics (Rajasekar)
Pre-req: INLS 560 or equivalent. The data explosion experienced by computerization of every aspect of our lives from social media to internet of things requires a deeper look at information analytics. The course introduces proven and emerging analytical techniques that can be used to deal with mountains of mostly unstructured data. We will look at several analytical paradigms from Predictive Modeling to Data Mining, Text Analytics to Web Analytics, Statistical Analysis to novel paradigms in Map Reduce and Storm, and from Crowd Sourcing to Scientific Workflows.  Knowledge of programming is essential. (3 credits)

690-187: Web Development (Hassell)
An introduction to front-end web development using the latest standards, HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. Basic knowledge of HTML and CSS is recommended. (1.5 credits)

690-189: Social Media and Society (Tufekci)
This course examines the increasingly important technologies of connectivity from a theoretical and empirical perspective. We will explore the evolution, implications and complications of social media in multiple spheres of life including sociality, community, power and inequality, education, knowledge, and information. Our emphasis will be not on one current platform (such as Facebook or Twitter) or a even a particular device. Rather, we will study how different configurations of connectivity encourage or stifle different socio-cultural practices and values. This course will provide conceptual and methodological foundations for studying and evaluating current and future development in this area. (3 credits)

690-212: Audio-Visual Archives Management (S. Wiess)
An introduction to the practice and curatorship of audio, film and video archives with an emphasis on the history of recording, best practices for preservation and access, copyright, and collection development.  Through selected readings, lecture, class discussion, assignments, and hands-on demonstrations, students will gain an understanding of the history of recording, format identification, philosophy of media preservation as well as copyright, and collection management. (1.5 credits)

690-215: Leadership: Nature and Nurture (Lowry)
The student will gain insight into the nature of leadership and its organizational impact. A major goal is to begin to understand personal interest in leadership roles for library and information agencies through examining the origins of leadership theory from classic models arising in political and military practice to modern research revealing how leadership emerges in the larger cultural context.  (1.5 credits) 

690-216: Social Sciences Information (Bardeen)
Prerequisite: INLS 501. Survey of information and its needs in the social sciences, with an emphasis on information use and search strategies and on reference and other information resources. (1.5 credits)

690-217: Humanities Information (Holloway)
Prerequisite: INLS 501. Survey of information and its needs in the humanities, with an emphasis on information use and search strategies and on reference and other information resources. (1.5 credits)

690-232: Business Information (Ernsthausen/Drewry)
 

This class introduces students to important information sources  and strategies needed to respond quickly and capably to the needs of patrons looking for data or news about companies, industries and market segments, business deals, new products, or other information that helps them make real-life, business-related decisions.  We will spend time with free and fee based data resources in electronic and print formats from commercial, organizational, and governmental providers.  We will also identify and apply evaluation criteria for business resources and discuss ways of conveying the importance of resource evaluation to clients. We will discuss the differences and similarities between the needs of academic researchers, entrepreneurs and small business owners, corporations, non-profits, community patrons, news organizations, governments and NGOs.   We will discuss the differences and similarities between business services in special, academic, and public libraries. 

690-233: Issues in Cloud Computing (Hassell)

Cloud computing claims to be a fundamentally new paradigm in which computing services and resources is migrating from personal computers sitting on a person's desk (or lap) to large, centrally managed datacenters.  We will evaluate this claim based on the basic paradigm of cloud computing.  Next we will examine the technical characteristics and the business reasons for cloud computing.  We will discuss common commercial and open source offerings.  Emphasis will be placed on cloud answers to common business computing issues, like scalability of processing and storage, security, relational and other database models.  Issues of privacy and security will also be addressed.

This will be a reading intensive course, with all material coming from open sources or from the university’s electronic holdings. 

Fall 2014

490-204: Going the Last Mile: Access to Information for Underserved Populations (Missen) 3 credits
Two thirds of the world's populations cannot access the Internet. Over 20% of Americans have no access to the Internet. Millions of incarcerated individuals need basic education but cannot use the Internet. Even when connected, people in remote areas often lack the bandwidth to use multimedia-rich Web offerings. In this course we will investigate the special challenges of providing information services to marginalized populations in an increasingly digital world. We'll examine the economic, political, and infrastructural barriers as well as learn about innovative efforts to deliver digital information to the bulk of the world's people who cannot afford conventional technologies.

690-036: Information Policy (Daniel) 3 credits
Following brief definitions and discussion of the terms policy, policy analysis, and information policy, we’ll explore various information policies we wish to consider during the course. Some candidate issues include intellectual property (copyright, ownership/licensing), Internet access (internet governance, filtering, digital divide), identity in cyberspace (big data and mining, digital presentation, personal information management), privacy (social media, comparison of US vs European practices), security and secrecy (government spying, Freedom of Information Act and uses, denial of service attacks, acceptable use policies), e-government (e-commerce and regulations, shift of methods of citizen access to web), misinformation and disinformation (“truthiness”). We will also examine through case study some nonprofit policy organizations that focus on information policy analysis. The primary assignment for the course will be a policy analysis paper. There is no textbook but students will be expected to read issues of the Journal of Information Policy in addition to other readings as assigned.

690-109: Scholarly Communication (Hemminger) 1.5 credits, meets August 19-October 2
Universities, research institutions, and scholarly communities are about the consumption and production of knowledge. This course will provide a survey of scholarly communication past and present with a particular emphasis on the changes in scholarly communication in the past ten years. We will examine the interaction between society, technology and scholarly communication, the theory and practice of the communication of knowledge in academic and research environments, and how developments in publishing and communication technologies are affecting changes in scholarly communications. Topics include scholarship, publishing models, open access/publishing/data/science, author’s rights, peer review, institutional repositories/preservation, and evaluating scholarship (bibliometrics and altmetrics).

690-141: Digital Forensics for the Curation of Digital Collections (Lee) 3 credits
Students will learn about hardware, software and methods used to extract digital data that have been stored on removable media (ie: hard drives, floppy disks, USB memory sticks), as well as extracting various forms of metadata to be incorporated into digital curation workflows. This course addresses common storage devices and interfaces; write-blocking equipment and its role in acquisition of data; levels of representation; basic filesystem structures; role and importance of hash values and hex views of bitstreams; and software used to conduct data acquisition. Students will have the opportunity to use a range of state-of-the-art digital forensics hardware and (commercial and open-source) software and explore ways that they can be applied by information professionals in a variety of collecting contexts.

690-154: Duke/UNC Joint Health Informatics Seminar (Mostafa) 1.0 credit
The Duke/UNC Joint Health Informatics Seminar Presentation Series is sponsored by Duke Center for Health Informatics and the Carolina Health Informatics Program.  This series explores key areas in Health Informatics and includes research results, overview of programs of research (both basic and applied), and evaluative projects.  Speakers with extensive informatics experiences and knowledge from both academia and industry are usually invited to present.   The general goal is to expose students to ongoing cutting-edge R&D issues in health informatics and add to their basic understanding of the area.   Students should aim to participate in a selected set of presentations that directly overlap with their own areas of interest and they are expected to synthesize the knowledge gleaned from the seminar presentations into a presentation which summarizes their key concepts and issues and their personal reflections on them.

690-159W: Financial Management in Information Organizations (M. Weiss) 1.5 credits, meets October 20-December 1
An introduction to financial management principles and practices intended for information professionals working in all types of organizations. Topics include accounting, auditing, budgeting, fundraising (private, crowdsourcing, grant) and understanding sources and uses of funds based on their type. A focus is placed on teaching students how to successfully advocate for needed funding based on a strategic and well communicated financial plan aligned with organizational goals.

690-163: Introduction to Big Data and NoSQL (Rajasekar) 1.5 credits, meets August 21-September 25
Pre-requisite: INLS 523 or equivalent. Growth in data is outstripping Moore's Law. Traditional solutions are inadequate to handle applications in Big Data. We explore problems and solutions in this area through non-traditional NoSQL databases.and data-intensive frameworks of Hadoop and Map-Reduce. Topics covered include Google's BigTable and Map-Reduce, Amazon's Dynamo, Apache's Cassandra, HBase, and Hadoop.

690-165: Web Development (Boone) 1.5 credits, meets August 20-October 8
An introduction to front-end web development using the latest standards, HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. Basic knowledge of HTML and CSS is recommended.

690-186: Web Information Organization (Shaw) 3 credit hours
This advanced information organization course focuses on understanding and using the Web as a platform for building information systems. Students will learn how the Web has been designed to be used as a service platform, a data publishing platform, and an application platform. Specific topics to be covered include: resources and representations, URIs, HTTP, MIME types, REST, microdata, microformats, the Semantic Web, Linked Data, and HTML5. Although the course will involve some programming, the focus will not be on programming Web sites but on understanding and applying the organizational principles of the Web. Students will develop a deep understanding of information architecture, not at the level of individual Web sites, but of the Web as a whole

690-207: Community Archiving (Anthony) 3 credits
Prerequisite: INLS 556.  A number of archivists are advocating for a new, collaborative model of archiving that empowers communities to look after their own records “by partnering professional archival expertise with communities’ deep sense of commitment and pride in their own heritage and identity.”  This class will explore the many ideas and issues surrounding this new model by working with a local community group to develop a comprehensive strategy for collecting, describing and maintaining their historical records in both analog and digital formats. The work will be informed by discussion of relevant literature and examination of other community archiving projects. 

690-208W: Web Archiving (Yoon) 1.5 credits, meets August 25-October 13
The purpose of this course is to provide knowledge of the Web as a source for archival collection development. Through lectures, analysis of Web archives, and hands on work, students will gain insight on relevant issues regarding the nature and characteristics of the Web and the use of the Web in their archival work. About half of this course will expose students to existing and emerging tools for capturing Web content, with an emphasis on laboratory practice using the current generation of Web crawlers

690-209W: Data Sharing Among Scientists (Yoon) 1.5 credits, meets October 20-December 1
This course will explore different issues related to data sharing among scientists. Students will look at different forms of data in different disciplines, and will learn the roles of data in scholarly research life cycle and research collaboration; relationships between data, data creators, data repositories, and data curators; basic principles of public policies for data and data management.

690-220: Management Issues for Small Libraries (Flaherty) 1.5 credits, meets August 25-October 13
This course provides an overview of a variety of management issues encountered in the small public library setting. Some topics that will be covered include: crafting policies and budgets, facilities management, personnel, working with boards (including Friends groups), grant writing and fundraising, advocacy, and patron issues. Case studies and "real life" examples will be used to demonstrate typical topics and issues encountered in the small public library.

690-223 Advanced Databases (Rajasekar) 1.5 credits, meets October 2-November 20
Pre-requisite: INLS 623 or equivalent. In this course we study concepts in database planning and administration. Topics include relational database configuration, administration and monitoring, security, performance tuning and disaster recovery. We will also touch upon emerging concepts in NoSQL database and Hadoop administration.

690-224: Visual Analytics (Gotz) 3 credits
This course will provide an overview of Visual Analytics, a topic that combines information visualization and data analysis to support analytical reasoning via highly interactive visual interfaces. The course will review foundational concepts, recent results, and commonly used technologies. The course is project-oriented and will require that students program their own web-based visualization systems using HTML and JavaScript. While no specific courses are considered pre-requisistes, students should be competent programmers. Prior experience with web programming (e.g., HTML and JavaScript) is strongly recommended.

690-225: Disaster Planning for Libraries (Flaherty) 1.5 credits, meets October 20-December 1
Disasters can come in a variety of forms (e.g. hurricanes, floods, fires, tornadoes, ect.) and strike at any time. Preparedness, prevention, and planning are all critical components of effective disaster responsiveness. In this course, students will learn about disaster prevention, recovery, training, and outreach as they apply to the library setting.

690-226: Digital Humanities (Poole) 3 credits
The digital humanities represent a “global, trans-historical, and transmedia approach to knowledge and meaning-making” (Burdick, et al. 2012, vii). They require an investment in interdisciplinarity and collaboration. Through discussion, hands-on activities, and work in small groups, students will learn about key concepts and tools in the digital humanities. Topics may include the definition and histories of DH; archival theory and practice; textuality and electronic scholarly editing; scholarly communication; text mining, analysis, and visualization; encoding, hypertext, and markup; modeling and knowledge representation; the spatial and temporal “turns”; game studies; and new media, mechanisms, and materiality. Overarching themes include social, legal, ethical questions (e.g. privacy, intellectual property, and open access) as well as project planning, management, and sustainability.

690-227: Mobile Web Development (Boone) 1.5 credits, meets October 13-December 3)
An introduction to techniques and technologies for the development of mobile websites. Topics include responsive web design, content strategy, performance, and use of mobile frameworks. Basic knowledge of HTML is required, and familarity with CSS and JavaScript is recommended.

690-228: Project Management (Nguyen) 1.5 credits meets October 8-December 3
This course presents a practical, minimalistic approach to project management that will provide students with the necessary strategies and skills to effectively manage generic projects.  The course integrates project management theory, based on the Project Management Institute’s A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), and with exposure to project management best practice through required lectures, readings, case studies, and different organizational perspectives. Assessment, practice and development of project management skills will be accomplished through individual participation in class and individual assignments, and also through team assignments that include the development of written documents, diagrams, presentation and peer evaluations.

 


 

Summer 2014

INLS 490-001: Metadata for Data Science (Greenberg) 3 credits
Explores the vital role of metadata for data science initiatives, big data, and data analytics. The course will cover historical, theoretical and practical issues specific to metadata and data science. Among selected topics covered are metadata models and standards, ontologies, metadata for the Semantic Web/linked data, automatic metadata generation, search, metadata quality, interoperability, and the evaluation of metadata. The course will introduce selected enabling technologies used to create machine understandable metadata. In class exercises and group assignments will provide practical experience.


 

Spring 2014

INLS 089: First Year Seminar: Social Movements and New Media (Tufecki)
The objective of this course is to enhance our conceptual and empirical understanding of the interaction between the new media ecology and social change. We will explore various approaches to studying social movements and social change and look at specific cases.

Governments and powerful institutions are also responding to the challenge posed by the emergence of the Internet as a mundane and global technology. From increased surveillance and filtering capacity, to delivering propaganda over the Internet to their own, from “hacking” of dissident websites to sophisticated methods of censorship, governments around the world are broadening their repertoire of social, technical and legal tools for control and suppression of --and through-- the Internet.

We will explore the integration of new media tools within these movements as well governmental and institutional responses to these developments. We will also discuss the rapidly changing and contested terrain for shaping the infrastructure of global connectivity. Materials for this class will include readings, videos (not to be viewed in class but as material to be viewed), and a variety of visiting speakers (both in person and via Skype).

INLS 490-172: Fundamentals of Programming Information Applications (Capra)
This course provides fundamental skills needed to design, implement, and maintain computer applications focused on information processing, management, retrieval, and presentation. Students will learn object-oriented programming, data structures, algorithm analysis, and data processing techniques in the context of information science topics such as metadata harvesting, information retrieval, text analysis, and user interfaces.  The course combines conceptual understanding of data structures and algorithms with practical techniques for implementation and debugging.  Uses the Python language. Pre-requisite: COMP 110, Introduction to Programming, or the equivalent.

INLS 490-176: Human Factors in Systems Design (Barlow)

Designing useful, usable, and appealing software, mobile applications, and consumer products requires consideration of human factors of the user's interaction with the system. The focus is human engineering design based in human sensory, motor, and cognitive capabilties. Through examples drawn from a variety of domains, the class will cover: History of human factors; Human perceptual, cognitive, and motor abilities; problem solving when interacting with human-made systems; the influence of technology on decision making; The sources of human error; User engagement; How people fit into technologicial systems; and social interactions around technology. The objectives of the course are: 1)To provide students with an understanding of the fundamental human factors that must be taken into account in system design and 2) whethere working on websites, automobile interiors, mobile devices, games, office productivity software, and enterprise softwrae, demonstrate there are common human engineering principles that must be considered in all systems design. 

INLS 490-211: Introduction of Human Information Interactions (Murillo)
Introduction to foundational and core concepts of human information behavior, including models of information seeking behavior, information needs and use, user-centered design, and human computer interaction.* Undergraduate students only*

INLS 690-165: Mobile Web Development (Boone, 1.5 credits)
An introduction to techniques and technologies for the development of mobile web sites and applications. Topics will include responsive web design and the jQuery Mobile framework for mobile development. Basic knowledge of HTML is required, and familiarity with CSS and JavaScript is recommended.

INLS 690-189: Social Media and Society: A Theoretical and Empirical Overview (Tufecki)

INLS 690-216: Social Sciences Information (Bardeen, 1.5 credits) 
Prerequisite: INLS 501. Survey of information and its needs in the social sciences, with an emphasis on information use and search strategies and on reference and other information resources.

INLS 690-217: Humanities Information (Holloway, 1.5 credits)
Prerequisite: INLS 501. Survey of information and its needs in the humanities, with an emphasis on information use and search strategies and on reference and other information resources.

INLS 890-030: Readings on Library and Information Science in the Middle East and North Africa (1 credit hour)
The purpose of this course is to expose students to some of the issues and trends in information and library science (ILS) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). From the great library at Alexandria, Dar al-Hikma and the Nizamiyya in Baghdad, ancient universities in Cairo and Fez to modern universities, museums, and libraries, the MENA region is home to some of the most important cultural institutions in the world. Students will read and discuss current literature on a variety of topics relevant to the ILS in the region. Guest speakers will lend an on-the-ground perspective to help explore the historical, cultural and geopolitical context of MENA. The course aims to broaden the perspective of students and help them to develop cultural competency related to this vibrant and dynamic are of the world. The course will be led by doctoral fellows in the ELIME-21 program at SILS(Moran) 

INLS 890-162: Digital Humanities: Explorations and Experimentation (Marciano)
In this interdisciplinary graduate seminar, we will explore concepts and case studies in the digital humanities and experiment with software and tools. 
 
INLS 890-190: Experimental Information Retrieval (Arguello)

Information Retrieval (IR) is a broad field, encompassing a wide-range of information-seeking tasks, such as web search, patent search, medical record search, and micro-blog search.  While the underlying goal is similar (i.e., to retrieve relevant or useful content in response to an information request), different tasks require different solutions and methods of evaluation.  This course takes an in-depth look at experimental IR systems that focus on different tasks and are evaluated in community-wide evaluation forums such as TREC and INEX.

INLS 890-215W: Leadership (Lowry, 1.5 credits) Class meets March 3-May 6 

The student will gain insight into the nature of leadership and its organizational impact. A major goal is to begin to understand personal interest in leadership roles for library and information agencies through examining the origins of leadership theory from classi models arising in political and military practice to modern research revealing how leadership emerges in the larger cultural context. This course will be taught synchronously over Skype video, with students meeting at SILS. Professor Lowry will physically join the class at SILS at least twice during the semester, first on March 3. 
 

Fall 2013

INLS 089-001: First Year Seminar: Social Movements and New Media (Tufecki)

INLS 490-161: Genealogies as a Digital Library Index (1.5 credits)
A genealogy can be used as an index into a digital library. We will explore the creation of core geneaologies that link the ancestry of persons of European descent, and use the core geneology as an index into Palmers "History of the Modern World". Students will able to link their own ancestry into the core ancestry. Access to a 236,000 person reseach geneology will be provided. (Moore)

INLS 490-211: Introduction to Human Information Interaction (3 credits)
Introduction to foundational and core concepts of human information behavior, including models of information seeking behavior, information needs and use, user-centered design, and human computer interaction.* Undergraduate students only* (Murillo)

INLS 490-204: Going the Last Mile: Information Access for Underserved Populations (3 credits

Two thirds of the world's populations cannot access the Internet. Over 20% of Americans have no access to the Internet. Millions of incarcerated individuals need basic education but cannot use the Internet. Even when connected, people in remote areas often lack the bandwidth to use multimedia-rich Web offerings. In this course we will investigate the special challenges of providing information services to marginalized populations in an increasingly digital world. We'll examine the economic, political, and infrastructural barriers as well as learn about innovative efforts to deliver digital information to the bulk of the world's people who cannot afford conventional technologies. (Missen)

INLS 690-030: Essentials of Human Resources Management (1.5 credits)
Prerequisite: INLS 585. Provides an introduction to the management of human resources in libraries and other information agencies. This course examines the increasingly important role of human resource professionals in today’s organizations. Important HR functions such as recruitment, selection, development, appraisal, retention, and compensation, will be discussed. In addition, the impact of external factors such as legislative and court decisions, unions and globalization on HR activities will be addressed. (Moran)

INLS 690-046: Planning, Implementing, and Auditing Trusted Digital Repositories (1.5 credits) (Tibbo)
INLS 690-141: Digital Forensics for Curation of Digital Collections (3 credits)

Students will learn about hardware, software and methods used to extract digital data that have been stored on removable media (ie: hard drives, floppy disks, USB memory sticks), as well as extracting various forms of metadata to be incorporated into digital curation workflows. This course addresses common storage devices and interfaces; write-blocking equipment and its role in acquisition of data; levels of representation; basic filesystem structures; role and importance of hash values and hex views of bitstreams; and software used to conduct data acquisition. Students will have the opportunity to use a range of state-of-the-art digital forensics hardware and (commercial and open-source) software and explore ways that they can be applied by information professionals in a variety of collecting contexts. (Lee/Woods)

INLS 690-150: Creating Resources for the Digital Curation Community (1.5 credits)
(Tibbo)

INLS 690-161: Digital Library Policies (1.5 credits)
Digital libraries make assertions about the digital contents, such as arrangement, descriptive metadata, access controls, completeness, and retention. We will explore the development of policies that enforces the desired digital library properties, and apply the policies to student collections management in the LifeTime Library. Students will be able to create a collection, define policies for managing the collection, and apply the policies to their own collection. (Moore)

INLS 690-163: Introduction to Big Data and NoSQL (3 credits)
Pre-requisite: INLS 523 or equivalent. Growth in data is outstripping Moore's Law. Traditional solutions are inadequate to handle applications in Big Data. We explore problems and solutions in this area through non-traditional NoSQL databases.and data-intensive frameworks of Hadoop and Map-Reduce. Topics covered include Google's BigTable and Map-Reduce, Amazon's Dynamo, Apache's Cassandra, HBase, and Hadoop. (Rajasekar)

INLS 690-172: Usability Testing and Evaluation (3 credits)(Capra)
INLS 690-189: Social Media and Society (3 credits)(Tufecki)

INLS 690-208: Web Archiving (1.5 credits)(Yoon)
The purpose of this course is to provide knowledge of the Web as a source for archival collection development. Through lectures, analysis of Web archives, and hands on work, students will gain insight on relevant issues regarding the nature and characteristics of the Web and the use of the Web in their archival work. About half of this course will expose students to existing and emerging tools for capturing Web content, with an emphasis on laboratory practice using the current generation of Web crawlers.

INLS 690-209: Trust in Repositories (1.5 credits)
This course will look closely at the concept of trust in digital repositories from different angles. From the repositories side, the class will discuss how repositories can develop trusted digital repositories (TDRs) such as that "trusted" information can be preserved. Students will have opportunities to work with several standards and tools to assess the trustworthiness of repositories (e.g.; TRAC, DRAMBORA). The course will also address from the users' side how users of digital repositories view TDRs and why it is important. (Yoon)

INLS 690-213: Rare Book Collection Fundamentals (1.5 credits)
What is the place of rare book collections in today's landscape of knowledge and information resources? This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of defining, developing, and administering rare book collections. Learning will be accomplished through class lectures, outside assigned readings, and the hands-on examination of books as artifacts. (Funke)

INLS 890-030: Readings ion Library and Information Science in the Middle East and North Africa
The purpose of this course is to expose students to some of the issues and trends in information and library science (ILS) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). From the great library at Alexandria, Dar al-Hikma and the Nizamiyya in Baghdad, ancient universities in Cairo and Fez to modern universities, museums, and libraries, the MENA region is home to some of the most important cultural institutions in the world. Students will read and discuss current literature on a variety of topics relevant to the ILS in the region. Guest speakers will lend an on-the-ground perspective to help explore the historical, cultural and geopolitical context of MENA. The course aims to broaden the perspective of students and help them to develop cultural competency related to this vibrant and dynamic are of the world. The course will be led by doctoral fellows in the ELIME-21 program at SILS. (Moran)

Spring 2013
INLS 089-001: First Year Seminar: Social Movements and New Media(3 credits)
INLS 490-151: Privacy by Design (3 credits)
Within organizations, the management of privacy has typically been addressed through the lens of regulatory compliance. For this reason, privacy is often confused with security, or treated as a set of static compliance practices. In recent years, the mainstreaming of ubiquitous social technologies, the widespread adoption of behavioral tracking and targeting, and the turn towards "Big Data" informatics have illustrated the challenges with, and failings for a compliance-based approach to privacy within organizations. A quick scan of the headlines will reveal these failings: large-scale data breaches, mobile apps leaking personal information, social media sites exposing users. For these failings, organizations lose esteem in the marketplace and are exposed to both civil and criminal penalties.
In recent years, the Privacy by Design movement has sought to address these failings by advocating a strong, centrally embedded role for privacy within organizations. By designing for privacy, organizations are able to maintain regulatory compliance, provide a positive experience for stakeholders, and advance competitively in a marketplace that values privacy. A central challenge of implementing the Privacy by Design approach is a lack of human capital; the goal of this course is to provided exposure and training for individuals interested in advocating for privacy within diverse organizations (e.g.; libraries, IT firms, health care, government, NGO's). In taking this course, students will be exposed to a highly interdisciplinary perspective on privacy, with readings from philosophy, economics, sociology, law and the computer and information sciences, among others. Students will learn the fundamentals of privacy, and through group-based study, analyze the application of privacy in design and policy. In doing so, students will develop a framework for understanding, implementing, and advocating for privacy within organizations.
INLS 490-186: Web Information Organization (3 credits)
This advanced information organization course focuses on understanding and using the Web as a platform for building information systems. Students will learn how the Web has been designed to be used as a service platform, a data publishing platform, and an application platform. Specific topics to be covered include: resources and representations, URIs, HTTP, MIME types, REST, microdata, microformats, the Semantic Web, Linked Data, and HTML5. Although the course will involve some programming, the focus will not be on programming Web sites but on understanding and applying the organizational principles of the Web. Students will develop a deep understanding of information architecture, not at the level of individual Web sites, but of the Web as a whole. (Shaw)
INLS 490-202: Health Information Sharing in Social Media (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of health information sharing using social media. It will cover the nature of user-generated content and types of content that are shared online, as well as examine online interactions among various parties in the health information ecosystem, such as health information consumers (i.e. patients, caregivers, family and friends), health care providers, health information services, insurance companies, and pharmaceutical. The course will also discuss benefits/drawbacks of health information exchange over social media and examine how design can affect user experience of health information exchange. It will include examples from a variety of types of social media, including social networking sites, blogs, online support groups, and Twitter.(Chen)
 
INLS 890-089: Information Policy and the Future of Libraries (3 credits)
The seminar will proceed in three stages: The first week will be exploratory and establish the broad range of topical interest as determined by seminar participants, laying out key definitions, stakeholders and processes; the second stage will provide depth and detail for these topics selected as a focus for the seminar and sketch the primary sources of information; the third will make explicit the ways in which libraries and information services are affected by policy considerations and suggestion directions and strategies for defining the policies that determine the future evolution of the information professions. As a major ingredient of the seminar, participants will collaborate in constructing a Wiki that reflects their research efforts and that can serve as a resource for librarians and information professionals. (Marchionini/Dillon)
INLS 890-147: Youth Services in a Diverse Society (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to work as youth services librarians in today’s increasingly diverse society. Students will develop a theoretical base in critical race theory (CRT) and other cross-disciplinary theories and conceptual frameworks, while they explore issues relevant to working as a Library and Information Science Professional with diverse and marginalized populations. The course includes a 30-hour service learning component that provides students with the opportunity to put their knowledge into practice by working with youth in diverse library settings. (Hughes-Hassell)
INLS 890-154: Electronic Health Records (3 credits)
Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are the backbone of modern clinical data management systems. In this class we will focus on EHR data standards with a strong emphasis on associated data management requirements, applications, services. (Mostafa)
INLS 890-190: Information Retrieval Experiments (3 credits)
INLS 890-194: Legal Issues for Libraries (3 credits)
INLS 890-204: Seminar in Course Design (3 credits)
Students will use advanced search skills and a variety of digitization technologies to create online courses and modules. The design process will focus on repurposing found objects, harnessing born digital documents, image creation and editing, scanning, practical web design, learning management systems (e.g., Moodle), and harnessing crowd sourcing to marshal hundreds of digital resources into a cohesive package for course delivery. The topics of the course will meld subject librarianship and digital course design. (Missen)
 
Fall 2012
INLS 089, First Year Seminar: Social Movements and New Media

Movements ranging from uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and beyond to “Occupy” protestors in the United States have been using new media technologies to coordinate, to organize, to intervene in the public sphere as well as to document, share, and shape their own stories. Using a range of tools from Facebook to Twitter, from satellite modems to landlines to ad-hoc mesh networks, these movements have made their mark in history.

The objective of this course is to enhance our conceptual and empirical understanding of the interaction between the new media ecology and social change. We will explore various approaches to studying social movements and social change and look at specific cases.

Governments and powerful institutions are also responding to the challenge posed by the emergence of the Internet as a mundane and global technology. From increased surveillance and filtering capacity, to delivering propaganda over the Internet to their own, from “hacking” of dissident websites to sophisticated methods of censorship, governments around the world are broadening their repertoire of social, technical and legal tools for control and suppression of --and through-- the Internet.

We will explore the integration of new media tools within these movements as well governmental and institutional responses to these developments. We will also discuss the rapidly changing and contested terrain for shaping the infrastructure of global connectivity. Materials for this class will include readings, videos (not to be viewed in class but as material to be viewed), and a variety of visiting speakers (both in person and via Skype). (Tufecki)

INLS 490-046, Data Management and Curation (3 credits)

This class will explore the full range of data curation lifecycle activities starting with the design of good data, through content creator management, metadata creation, ingest into a repository, repository management, access policies and implementation, and data reuse. Speakers from the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences will discuss data requirements in their fields and data curators will discuss challenges and current best practices as well as resource allocators. Data management plans for various funders such as NSF and NIH will be explored and federal funders will join in this discussion. (Tibbo)

INLS ;490-161, Building a Personal Digital Library (3 credits)

This class will prepare students to implement their own personal digital LifeTime Library. The collection that is assembled at SILS will be maintained throughout their academic career, and will be available for migration to their own laptop when they graduate. Topics covered will include: creation of a personal digital library including organization of the material, creation of descriptive metadata, management of the collection, and sharing of the collection.
The LifeTiime Library will be based on the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS). The iRODS software implements policy-based data management. Up to 250Gigabytes of storage space will be provided for each student. During the course, we will investigate choice of user interface, automation of digital library management functions, enforcement of management policies, and assessment of collection properties. Students will be able to use the LifeTime Library to manage class material, organize multi-media material, archive personal data collections, and share selected material.

Students will be asked to test the digital library, help evaluate the functionality, and generate ideas for improving the system. Students are encouraged to think of themselves as the innovators in the development of digital libraries that will be used by other students. (Moore)

INLS 490-172, Personal Information Management (3 credits)

Personal Information Management (PIM) is the study of how people organize and manage information in their daily lives, including to-do lists, calendars, email, address books, and file management. In today's digital age, many devices including cell phones, computers, PDAs, and music players play a role in PIM. This course will focus on major issues in PIM research, including information organization, human cognitive and memory issues, task continuity across devices, mental models of information, usability issues, and the role of technology in PIM. The course will be structured as a readings and discussion seminar with a semester-long research project. Students will become familiar with current PIM research and will design and implement a research study of PIM. Students will also prepare "a day in the life of my PIM" presentations to share aspects of their own personal information management techniques and challenges and to stimulate classroom discussion. (Capra)

INLS 490-188, User Experience Design (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview of user experience (UX) design. We will cover some of the basic concepts and techniques used to create useful and purposeful information systems, as well as the basic process for leading such projects. This course is practical in nature, and focuses on how people will interact with information systems. The outcome of the design process is a series of blueprints for the system. We will not discuss how to build systems, but rather, you will learn about how to shape strategy and structure design in order to empower end users, and as a result, create good business for the project’s stakeholders. (Velasco-Martin)

INLS 490-189, Social Media and Society: A Theoretical and Empirical Overview (3 credits)

This course examines the increasingly important technologies of connectivity from a theoretical and empirical perspective. We will explore the evolution, implications and complications of social media in multiple spheres of life including sociality, community, politics, power and inequality, education, knowledge, and information. Our emphasis will not be on any one current platform (such as Facebook or Twitter) or even a particular device. Rather, we will study how different configurations of connectivity encourage or stifle different socio-cultural practices and values. This course will provide conceptual and methodological foundations for studying and evaluating current and future developments in this area. (Tufekci)

INLS 890-186, Making the Humanities Digital (3 credits)

What can you do with digital libraries and archives? This seminar will examine how and why humanist scholars are turning to computational tools to "distantly read" digital texts. Topics to be investigated include: the creation of digital texts, computational methods and tools for the study of digital texts, visualization of textual relationships, interdisciplinary work in the humanities, and critiques of the digital humanities. Implications for libraries and archives and museums will be emphasized throughout.

The course will meet once a week and will be organized as two parallel threads. The first half of each meeting will be devoted to discussing readings and developing an understanding of the theoretical, philosophical, and political dimensions of the topics. The second half will be devoted to hands-on work, using and making tools for humanistic exploration of digital texts. Interested or skeptical graduate students in the humanities, information and library science, and computer science are all encouraged to participate. (Shaw)
 

INLS 490-040: Information From Processes (3 credits)
A discipline approach to studying information will examine information in a variety of contexts. The emphasis will be on the rigorous examination of how information is produced by processes. Certain domains and types of processes will be emphasized, such as coding, secrecy, representation, natural language, and the economic value of information. The main text will be Information from Processes (available online through Davis Library) with other supplemental readings. (Losee)
Spring 2012
INLS 089, First Year Seminar: Cultures of Online Social Networks (3 credits)
The objective of this course is to enhance and extend our understanding of virtual or online communities and their relationship with culture. We will explore social capital and various approaches to understanding online social networks then look specifically at youth culture, politics, music and arts, advertising and media. We will not only look at technologies that assist in social networking, but we will develop literacies and communication skills using vernacular video and animation as well as writing for online discussion within out class as a community. (Jones)

INLS 490-109, Information Visualization (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to the field of Information Visualization through readings of current literature and studying exemplars. A comprehensive review is given of the different types of information visualization techniques. The course provides students a framework for identifying the information visualization need, and determining the appropriate choice of data mappings and visualization techniques. A strong emphasis is placed on interactive electronic visualizations using freely available tools. Students will construct several visualizations as part of the class; however, no programming skills are required. There are no prerequisites. (Hemminger)

INLS 490-121, Library Assessment (3 credits)

This course will provide an overview of evaluation and assessment activities in libraries. Students will consider various library operations as evaluands, and the extent to which these operations are evaluable. Students will become familiar with existing tools for evaluating library operations, will design their own evaluation, and conduct their own evaluation research. (Pomerantz)

INLS 490-161, Policy-Based Data Management (3 credits)

Prepares students to develop and implement computer actionable policies for the LifeTime Library and digital repositories. Examples include policies to validate trustworthiness, enforce library services, and automate administrative functions. The policies will be implemented as rules in the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS), which organizes distributed data into a sharable collection.

Students will apply the policies on personal collections in the LifeTime Library. Previous experience with programming will be very helpful. Students should have taken the equivalent of Computer Science 110 or 116. Knowledge of the material in INLS-461 "Information Tools" will be very helpful. (Moore)

INLS 490-176, Usability Engineering (3 credits)

This course introduces students to human factors as applied to software user interfaces. The course will focus on human perception, memory, problem solving, error, and workload. They will learn usability evaluation techniques and apply the human factors knowledge to the assessment of human-computer interfaces. After completing the course, students will be able to identify the human factors relevant to a usability problem and evaluate the usability of a human-computer interface. (Barlow)

INLS 490-186, Web Information Organization (3 credits)

This advanced information organization course will focus on understanding and using the Web as a platform for building information systems. Students will learn how the Web has been designed to be used as a service platform, a data publishing platform, and an application platform. Specific topics to be covered include: resources and representations, URIs, HTTP, MIME types, REST, microdata, microformats, the Semantic Web, Linked Data, and HTML5. Although the course will involve some programming, the focus will not be on programming Web sites but on understanding and applying the organizational principles of the Web. Students will develop a deep understanding of information architecture, not at the level of individual Web sites, but of the Web as a whole. (Shaw)

INLS 890-040, What is Information? (3 credits)

What is information and how is it produced? A discipline independent view of information is discussed, with an emphasis on how information is produced by processes, also taken in a discipline independent way. Applications of this model of information from processes are developed for a range of environments and needs, including physical processes, representation, reasoning, language, knowledge, and valuing information. Discussions will often address informational foundations and aspects of systems of various sorts. No “IT,” just “I.” (Losee)

INLS 890-123, Seminar in Research Methodology (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to formally guide students’ exploration of, and engagement with, a series of topics related to research design, including theory, measurement and data collection. This course also introduces students to the sociology of science, ethics and scientific integrity. Prerequisite: PhD standing or permission of instructor. (Kelly)

INLS 890-147, Youth Services in a Diverse Society (3 credits)

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to work as youth services librarians in today’s increasingly diverse society. Students will develop a theoretical base in critical race theory (CRT), cross-disciplinary theories and conceptual frameworks, while they explore issues relevant to working as a Library and Information Science Professional with diverse and marginalized populations: empowerment, inclusion, pluralism and equity; curriculum design and program development; selecting, evaluating, promoting and mediating culturally relevant texts; censorship, literacy, and access to information.

This course will partner with Durham County School Librarians and libraries to identify programmatic needs, develop programming, and deliver services related to literacy and information access for the diverse student population. Students are required to complete 30 hours of service learning. (Hughes-Hassell)

INLS 890-154, Electronic Health Records (3 credits)

In the class we will consider some of the recent efforts on EHR data standards, with a strong focus on associated data management requirements, applications, and services. Along with a close examination of the standards criteria being developed by the Certification Commission of Health Information Technology (CCHIT), the course will also cover related standards such as Health Level 7 (HL7) and Clinical Data Interchange and Standards Consortium (CDISC). The course is aimed at data management specialists, data management administrators, and students interested in health data management.

Context for the Course: Standards are needed to ensure medical information systems offer state-of-the-art functions, are secure, and can inter-operate with a variety of organizations and systems. There is currently significant momentum for selecting and using EHRs, driven by the financial incentives specified in the American Recovery and Reinvestment bill which became US law in 2009. The US is investing about 20 billion dollars in the area of health information technology and with promises of more investments in the near future. The Office of National Coordinator of Health Information Technology is assembling use cases in various areas of health including pediatric care, long-term chronic care, adverse event reporting, and medications. Alongside consumer-oriented support services, there is also a significant effort on developing state-level health information exchanges and a federal architecture for health information exchange. (Mostafa)

INLS 890-162, Digital Humanities: Explorations and Experimentation

To be announced. (Marciano)

INLS 890-190, Experimental Information Retrieval (3 credits)

Information retrieval (IR) is a broad field, encompassing various search tasks such as expert (people) search, blog retrieval, micro-blog search and mining, legal search, book search, etc. The goal of this course will be to survey these different areas in detail, focusing on work presented in yearly community-wide evaluation forums like TREC, INEX, CLEF, and TAC. Students will choose a task, conduct a literature review, present the material in class, and, by the end of the semester, put together a system using existing tools in their chosen area. Prerequisite: INLS 509 or permission of instructor. (Arguello)

INLS 890-193, Information Policy and the Future of Libraries (3 credits)

This course will explore policies, stated and de facto, of the government, organizations, and institutions that guide the behaviors of the information industries, with a focus on those that affect the role of libraries and information services. A secondary objective will be to examine the policy formation process: to understand it, critique it, and seek ways to influence it.

The seminar will proceed in 3 stages. The first will be exploratory and establish the broad regions of topical interest as determined by seminar participants, laying out key definitions, stakeholders and processes; the second will provide depth and detail for those topics selected as a focus for the seminar and sketch the primary sources of information; the third will make explicit the ways in which libraries and information services are affected by policy considerations and suggest directions and strategies for influencing the policies that affect the future evolution of the information professions. As a major ingredient of the seminar, participants will collaborate in constructing a Wiki that reflects their research efforts and that can serve as a resource for librarians and information professionals. (Dillon)

INLS 890-194, Legal Issues for Librarians (3 credits)

Legal issues are growing ever more prominent and complex in 21st century libraries. New technologies have created not only controversial copyright issues, but a host of other challenges as well, including access for patrons to materials well beyond the scope of the library selection process and issues about what privacy and free expression mean in a digital environment. This course will examine these and other legal issues in libraries, looking both at the “black letter” law that applies and the ethical and management issues involved. Students will gain experience in reading and analyzing primary legal materials, identifying major legal issues facing librarians, locating and employing reliable sources of legal information to support library practice, and creating policy to guide specific types of libraries. (Cross/Smith)

INLS 890-03W, Evidence-Based Medicine (3 credits)

This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. Students will practice these skills and explore the role of the librarian in the supporting EBM within their institutions. The course runs for 8 to 10 consecutive weeks. (Schardt/Myatt)

Spring 2011
INLS 089: Information Policy: Privacy and Identity (First Year Seminar)
As creators, consumers, and distributors of information, we are constantly faced with decisions regarding how to interact with information in an active and responsible manner. We need to think critically about individual assumptions and behaviors and how these actions impact and inform the larger society. At the same time, the influences of information activities by others (both individuals, organizations, and nations) help shape our identity. Through the lens of the information society, this seminar addresses major debates regarding the ideal characteristics of the world in which we are living. In addition, this seminar explores, traces, and analyzes major individual and societal issues regarding the ethics and policy of the information life-cycle in various contexts. As a member of the global information society, this course will guide you in understanding the rights and responsibilities of various stakeholders in information policy decisions; it will challenge you to defend and analyze your behavior and opinions in this information environment. (Daniel)
INLS 490-141: Acquisition of Information from Digital Media (1 credit)
Students will learn about hardware, software and methods used to extract digital data that have been stored on removable media (ie: hard drives, floppy disks, USB memory sticks). This course addresses common storage devices and interfaces; write-blocking equipment and its role in acquisition of data; levels of representation; basic filesystem structures; role and importance of hash values and hex views of bitstreams; and software used to conduct data acquisition. Students will have the opportunity to use a range of state-of-the-art digital forensics hardware and (commercial and open-source) software and explore ways that they can be applied by information professionals in a variety of collecting contexts.(Lee)
INLS 490-161: Building a Personal Digital Library (1 credit)
This class will prepare students to implement their own personal digital LifeTime Library. The collection that is assembled at SILS will be maintained throughout their academic career, and will be available for migration to their own laptop when they graduate. Topics covered will include: creation of a personal digital library including organization of the material, creation of descriptive metadata, management of the collection, and sharing of the collection.
The LifeTime Library will be based on the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS). The iRODS software implements policy-based data management. Up to a terabyte of storage space will be provided for each student. During the course, we will investigate choice of user interface, automation of digital library management functions, enforcement of management policies, and assessment of collection properties. Students will be able to use the LifeTime Library to manage class material, organize multimedia material, archive personal data collections, and share selected material.
Students will be asked to test the digital library, help evaluate the functionality, and generate ideas for improving the system. Students are encouraged to think of themselves as the innovators in the development of digital libraries that will be used by other students. (Moore/Rajasekar)
INLS 490-163: Policy-Based Data Mgmt
Prepares students to develop and implement policies for digital repositories and curation of digital collections, including formulation of policies that can be enacted through computer actionable rules, adapting existing rules and developing new rules. The rules will be developed for the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS), which organizes distributed data into a sharable collection.
Previous experience with programming will be very helpful. Students should have taken the equivalent of Computer Science 110 or 116. Knowledge of the material in INLS-461 "Information Tools" will be very helpful. (Rajasekar/Moore)
INLS 890-092: Seminar in Knowledge Organization
Fundamental questions: What is knowledge? Why and how do we develop knowledge organization systems? What are the implications of knowledge organization systems and approaches?
This class explores theoretical foundations, historical approaches, and current practices for organizing knowledge. The class will encompass a wide-range knowledge organization systems, from general terminological and classificatory schemes to domain specific semantic systems, including thesauri, taxonomies, and ontologies. An emphasis will be on research advancing our philosophical understanding of knowledge organization and theoretical and practical implications for this topic in the digital world.
Several selected topics covered include Aristotle--reality and knowledge; Baconian classification; Linnaean taxonomy; Dewey--whole world approach for KO; Ranganathan--analytico-synthetic classification and facet analysis; the Semantic Web; and metadata.
The course is a seminar and will emphasize reading and class discussion. Deliverables will include reporting on assigned topics and a *final* project, paper, annotated bibliography, or research plan that contributes to larger research effort.
(Pre-requisites: INLS 520, 521, 720, or instructor's permission) (Greenberg)
INLS 890-096 Evidence-Based Health Information Practice: Evidence-Based practice (EBP) is being adopted by a variety of professions as a way of finding and using the best available research-based evidence for decision making. As such, EBP can be seen as a tool for linking research to practice and thereby improving the quality of health care. This course will explore the origins of evidence-based practice in the health professions and the important role that information professionals have in developing information services and systems that support EBP. The application of EBP to information and library practice will also be explored. (Marshall)
INLS 890-123 Research Design:
This course formally guides students' exploration of, and engagement with, a series of advanced topics related to research design, including theory, measurement and data collection. This course also introduces students to the sociology of science, ethics and scientific integrity. This course is for Ph.D. students or advanced Master's students (where advanced means that the student has completed INLS 780 or some other equivalent). It is assumed that all students have completed a basic research methods course and have had some exposure to statistics and data analysis. (Kelly)
INLS 890-154 Electronic Health Records: Emerging Standards, Applications, and Services
Goals:

In the class we will consider some of the recent efforts on EHR data standards, with a strong focus on associated data management requirements, applications, and services. Along with a close examination of the standards criteria being developed by the Certification Commission of Health Information Technology (CCHIT), the course will also cover related standards such as Health Level 7 (HL7) and Clinical Data Interchange and Standards Consortium (CDISC). The course is aimed at data management specialists, data management administrators, and students interested in health data management.
Context for the Course: Standards are needed to ensure medical information systems offer state-of-the-art functions, are secure, and can inter-operate with a variety of organizations and systems. There is currently significant momentum for selecting and using EHRs, driven by the financial incentives specified in the American Recovery and Reinvestment bill which became US law in 2009. The US is investing about 20 billion dollars in the area of health information technology and with promises of more investments in the near future. The Office of National Coordinator of Health Information Technology is assembling use cases in various areas of health including pediatric care, long-term chronic care, adverse event reporting, and medications. Alongside consumer-oriented support services, there is also a significant effort on developing state-level health information exchanges and a federal architecture for health information exchange. (Mostafa)
INLS 890-162: Digital Humanities (1 credit)

This course explores topics in the digital humanities. These include: text, time & space, scale, preservation, social networking and cyber-infrastructure. The focus will be on virtual cities and digital histories and tools to manage this type of content. The class meets once a week on Wednesday mornings (8:15- 9:15am) and will consist of classroom instruction, guest lectures, class discussions, and a project. (Marciano)

INLS 890-180/PUBH 690: Project Management This course presents classic project management concepts and methods that will be applied to current projects to develop a toolbox of strategies to effectively manage projects. It is composed of weekly modules. The content of each module is presented through classroom instruction, internet lectures, guest lecturers, class discussions and assignments. Required reading and written assignments reinforce and expand the lectures and discussions. (Evarts)
INLS 890-183: UNC/Duke Joint Research Seminar This seminar is a collaborative effort between UNC and Duke and will explore key areas in Health Informatics including research results, overview of programs of research, basic, applied, and evaluative projects, as well as research from varied epistemological stances. This class meets once a week on Wednesday afternoons (4:30-5:30pm) and will consist of guest lectures and discussions via video conference. (Mostafa)
INLS 890-03W: Evidence-Based Medicine This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based Medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. Students will practice these skills and explore the role of the librarian in the supporting EBM within
their institutions. The course runs for 8 to 10 consecutive weeks. (Schardt/Myatt)
Fall 2010
INLS 490-161: Core Genealogy
A genealogy maps family traditions to historical events and cultural tradition. A core genealogy defines the set of related people to which all persons within a given culture can link their ancestry. A core genealogy can be used as a unifying index into a digital collection or archive. The events that are documented within the archive can be indexed based on the relationships between the persons involved in each event. This course will explore a core genealogy for persons of European descent. The core genealogy will be used to index historical persons referenced in "A History of the Modern World" by Palmer and Colton. Your family's genealogy may link into the same core genealogy. (Moore)
INLS 890-046: Seminar in Digital Curation
Explores a range of issues central to digital curation and trustworthy repositories including history and definition of digital curation; lifecycle management of digital assets; digital collection building; codifying relationships and agreements with contributors and partner institutions; audit and certification; standards development; related aspects of organizational behavior; project and risk management; preservation strategies; policy setting and external policies relevant to repository management. This class is designed for doctoral students and upper level masters students and will involve several international expert guest lecturers. (Tibbo)
INLS 890-159: Contemporary Issues in Information Technology (IT) Organizations
This course examines the contemporary issues information technology departments and IT leaders face in both the for-profit and non-profit enterprise. Topics covered will include: security, intellectual property, privacy, virtualization, cloud computing, green computing, Web 2.0, enterprise resource planning, human resources, governance, project management, funding, business alignment, evaluation, leadership, strategy, management and the Chief Information Officer (CIO) position. Additionally, IT career pathways will be explored. Through readings, class discussion, class presentations, guest speakers and research studies, students will examine contemporary issues in IT organizations and have the opportunity to interact with and learn from academic and industry technology leaders. (Weiss)
Summer 2010
INLS 890-154 Electronic Health Records: Emerging Standards, Applications, and Services
Goals
In the class we will consider some of the recent efforts on EHR data standards, with a strong focus on associated data management requirements, applications, and services. Along with a close examination of the standards criteria being developed by the Certification Commission of Health Information Technology (CCHIT), the course will also cover related standards such as Health Level 7 (HL7) and Clinical Data Interchange and Standards Consortium (CDISC). The course is aimed at data management specialists, data management administrators, and students interested in health data management.
Context for the Course
Standards are needed to ensure medical information systems offer state-of-the-art functions, are secure, and can inter-operate with a variety of organizations and systems. There is currently significant momentum for selecting and using EHRs, driven by the financial incentives specified in the American Recovery and Reinvestment bill which became US law in 2009. The US is investing about 20 billion dollars in the area of health information technology and with promises of more investments in the near future. The Office of National Coordinator of Health Information Technology is assembling use cases in various areas of health including pediatric care, long-term chronic care, adverse event reporting, and medications. Alongside consumer-oriented support services, there is also a significant effort on developing state-level health information exchanges and a federal architecture for health information exchange. (Mostafa)
Spring 2010
INLS 089: First Year Seminar
Bought, burned, or borrowed: Information ethics and policy in the world around us

As creators, consumers, and distributors of information, we are constantly faced with decisions regarding how to interact with information in an active and responsible manner. It is essential to think critically about individual assumptions and behaviors and how these actions impact and inform the larger society. At the same time, it is inevitable to avoid the influences of others' information activities that shape our past, present, and future. Through the lens of the information society, this seminar addresses major debates regarding the ideal characteristics of the world in which we are living. In addition, this seminar explores, traces, and analyzes major individual and societal issues regarding the ethics and policy of the information life-cycle in various contexts. As a member of the global information society, this course guides you in understanding the rights of various stakeholders and challenges you to defend and analyze your behaviors in this information environment. (Choemprayang/Sugimoto)
INLS 490-01W: PHP Programming
Prerequisites: INLS 572 or familiarity with the structure of HTML and the Web. Knowledge of some programming and SQL will also be useful. The course covers the fundamentals of PHP server-side scripting, including variables, arrays, flow control, functions etc., and Web-related issues such as forms, session management, cookies, authentication of users and so on. (Song)
INLS 490-078: Personal Information Management
Personal Information Management (PIM) is the study of how people organize and manage information in their daily lives, including to-do lists, calendars, email, address books, and file management. In today's digital age, many devices including cell phones, computers, PDAs, and music players play a role in PIM. This course will focus on major issues in PIM research, including information organization, human cognitive and memory issues, task continuity across devices, mental models of information, usability issues, and the role of technology in PIM. The course will be structured as a readings and discussion seminar with a semester-long research project. Students will become familiar with current PIM research and will design and implement a research study of PIM. Students will also prepare "a day in the life of my PIM" presentations to share aspects of their own personal information management techniques and challenges and to stimulate classroom discussion. (Barreau)
INLS 490-089: Video Information
This course addresses the growing importance of digital video in work, education, and leisure. Principles and techniques for finding digital video, reusing video, and creating new video are considered with emphasis on creating and using surrogates that support retrieval and reuse. (Marchionini)
INLS 490-151: Online Social Networks
This course is a primer on the study of online social networks. We explore the theory, methods and findings of a growing literature on the topic. We also explore applications and use cases, particularly in the context of education and library/information services. While online social networks are but a subset of social software, this course provides strong fundamentals for exploring the multiple facets of our pervasive online sociality. (Stutzman)
INLS 490-109: Information Visualization
This course provides an introduction to the field of Information Visualization through readings of current literature and studying exemplars. A comprehensive review is given of the different types of information visualization techniques. The course provides students a framework for identifying the information visualization need, and determining the appropriate choice of data mappings and visualization techniques. A strong emphasis is placed on interactive electronic visualizations using freely available tools. Students will construct several visualizations as part of the class; however, no programming skills are required. There are no prerequisites. (Hemminger)
INLS 490-154: Information Retrieval and Search Engines
The course will concentrate on introducing principles and theories of information retrieval with a strong emphasis on the architecture, design, and evaluation of search engines. The course will begin with a focus on statistical theories that are relevant to analyzing textual information. The architecture and design of modern information retrieval systems, particularly search engines, will be covered next. The middle part of the course will concentrate on retrieval models and ranking. The area of query transformation and interface design will be the subsequent focus. The course will conclude with several weeks of treatment of the key area of retrieval evaluation. Although formal programming background is not assumed, basic experience in programming would be helpful. Prospective students are encouraged to contact the instructor regarding prerequisite experience.
(Mostafa)
490-161: iRODS Rule Construction
This class will prepare students to develop and implement policies for digital repositories and curation of digital collections. This includes formulation of policies that can be enacted through computer-actionable rules, adapting existing rules and developing new rules. The rules will be developed for the integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS), which organizes distributed data into a shared collection. Rules are used to automate collection administration, or enforce policies, or validate assessment criteria. Students will work in groups to define policies and identify rules for particular digital curation situations.
Topics covered will include: design requirements for sustainable digital repositories; ensuring and proving trustworthiness of repositories; policy-driven data management; strategies for writing policies that can be enacting with rules; iRODS architecture; interfaces to iRODS, including command-line interface; iRODS software installation and configuration; principles of rule-oriented programming; iRODS rule grammar; iRODS micro-services; managing and invoking rules; standard and default rules; identifying conditions and timing of rules; composing workflows for digital curation; and creating, managing and using metadata within iRODS.
Students should have taken INLS 460 (Information Tools) or have equivalent knowledge of information technology. Previous experience with programming will be very helpful but is not required. (Moore/Marciano/Rajasekar/Lee)
INLS 490-176: Usability Engineering
This course introduces students to usability evaluation techniques as applied to software user interfaces. The course will focus on practical aspects of usability evaluation. By planning and executing their own evaluation, students will gain hands-on experience with skills critical in user-centered design. They will learn both objective and subjective usability evaluation techniques for refining and validating user interface designs. After completing the course, students will be able to choose the appropriate evaluation methodology and perform an evaluation using one of several techniques. (Barlow)
INLS 890-03W: Evidence Based Medicine
This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure--call no. 86276) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based Medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. In particular, the role of the librarian in the practice of EBM will be covered. The course runs for 8 to 10 consecutive weeks. Instructors are Connie Schardt (schar005@mc.duke.edu) from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Angela Myatt (angela.myatt@unc.edu) of the University of Cincinnati. (Schardt/Myatt)
INLS 890-087: Communication Skills for Information Professionals
This course seeks to develop students' ability to communicate effectively. The emphasis is on the skills necessary to communicate orally, in writing, and in digital environments. By the end of the course, students should have a better sense of how they communicate, where their strengths and weaknesses are, and how to improve their abilities to maximize the persuasive and informational power of their performances. (Sturm)
INLS 890-092: Seminar in Knowledge Organization
Fundamental questions: What is knowledge? Why and how do we develop knowledge organization systems? What are the implications of knowledge organization systems and approaches?
This class explores theoretical foundations, historical approaches, and current practices for organizing knowledge. The class will encompass a wide-range knowledge organization systems, from general terminological and classificatory schemes to domain specific semantic systems, including thesauri, taxonomies, and ontologies. An emphasis will be on research advancing our philosophical understanding of knowledge organization and theoretical and practical implications for this topic in the digital world.

Several selected topics covered include Aristotle--reality and knowledge; Baconian classification; Linnaean taxonomy; Dewey--whole world approach for KO; Ranganathan--analytico-synthetic classification and facet analysis; the Semantic Web; and metadata.

The course is a seminar and will emphasize reading and class discussion. Deliverables will include reporting on assigned topics and a *final* project, paper, annotated bibliography, or research plan that contributes to larger research effort.
(Pre-requisites: INLS 520, 521, 720, or instructor's permission) (Greenberg)
INLS 890-96: Informed Decision Making for Cancer Care Quality
Cancer care quality depends on providers, patients, and families having the right information at the right time-and then using that information to make informed cancer care decisions. This course will equip participants with knowledge about (a) the determinants of informed decision-making in cancer care, and (b) the potential and the limitations of the tools that are currently available for improving the quality of decision-making. This course will examine clinical decision-making in cancer care from the perspectives of providers, patients, and families. The course is predicated on the notion that cancer care quality depends on productive interactions between prepared, proactive practice teams and informed, activated patients and families (cf. Chronic Care Model). Knowledge competencies will be
assessed through a written plan in which program participants describe an intervention to improve cancer care quality through informed decision-making. In the plan, class participants must describe the target population, the need for the intervention, propose an intervention, review the evidence supporting the intervention, and describe how they would evaluate the intervention's effectiveness. (Marshall)
INLS 890-123: Research Design
This course formally guides students' exploration of, and engagement with, a series of advanced topics related to research design, including theory, measurement and data collection. This course also introduces students to the sociology of science, ethics and scientific integrity. This course is for Ph.D. students or advanced Master's students (where advanced means that the student has completed INLS 780 or some other equivalent). It is assumed that all students have completed a basic research methods course and have had some exposure to statistics and data analysis. (Kelly)
INLS 890-177: Strategic Use of Digital Information in Enterprises
If you want to work in the corporate world, this course will help you understand the growing importance of information science in enterprises.
An unprecedented access to real-time and unfiltered world information is providing enterprise with new strategic information assets. The ability to pull value from this data is a crucial competitive differentiator. The challenge is to turn this massive amount and continuous stream of data and information into knowledge and insights in real-time to provide actionable information to assist decision makers in enterprises.

This course will cover the new emerging generation of information systems used to manage the explosion of this new real-world real-time information. Students will perform market planning tasks similar to those used in enterprise, they will experience what knowledge workers do on a daily basis in enterprises. Guest executive speakers from local businesses will provide direct insight into the corporate world.

Topics will include strategic planning for competitive advantage, the technology life cycle, portfolio analysis, uses of social networks in enterprises, data warehousing, text mining, digitizing unstructured data, and digital data management technology.
(Bezy)

 
Fall 2009
INLS 490-01W: Information Retrieval Systems Design and Implementation
Tools for organizing and accessing information have become indispensable. It is critical, therefore, to understand their design and operational foundations. In this course students will have an opportunity to learn about search engines, web crawling, and some Web 2.0 technologies based on hands-on experience and with a focus on techniques that can be used to access, retrieve, organize, and present information. Students will work with practical developmental tools and learn relevant concepts through experimentation. For instance, students will employ an open source search engine and learn about indexing, retrieving, and ranking techniques. Students who successfully complete this course may request a waiver of the core course requirement of INLS 509: Information Retrieval taught by Prof. Losee. Please note that this course is application oriented and that it can be considered as an alternative to the current 509 for those with a programming background, but that both courses can be taken to good effect by students who want more knowledge and application of information retrieval. (Shah)

Prerequisites
The students are expected to have a previous exposure to some programming (C, Java, Perl, or PHP). Basic programming experience acquired in an introductory programming course such as INLS 490-153 or in some professional settings is recommended. Please see the course website for more details.

INLS 490-151: Online Social Networks
This course is a primer on the study of online social networks. We explore the theory, methods and findings of a growing literature on the topic. We also explore applications and use cases, particularly in the context of education and library/information services. While online social networks are but a subset of social software, this course provides strong fundamentals for exploring the multiple facets of our pervasive online sociality. (Stutzman)
INLS 490-156: Programming
Introduction to programming and problem solving using the Java language. Fundamentals of programming languages including basic computation, flow of control, file handling, graphical user interfaces, and object-oriented concepts. This course is intended for students who have never programmed before, but are familiar with HTML/CSS, and have taken Information Tools (INLS 461). (Boone)
INLS 890-01W: Leadership
The course addresses leadership theory, principles and practices and considers the nature of leadership roles at all levels of the organization, the role of leaders in fostering organizational success, and the recurring professional and leadership issues within the national and international structure of library and information science. Emphasis will be placed on the self-awareness of leaders, leadership roles and opportunities, leadership development, and leadership evaluation. The context is on leadership in the management of libraries and information service organizations. (Griffiths)
INLS 890-03W: Evidence Based Medicine
This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based Medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. In particular, the role of the librarian in the practice of EBM will be covered. The course runs for 7 consecutive weeks. It will take a total of approximately 30 hours to complete the course (plus the final project), depending on previous knowledge of EBM and other factors. Instructors are Connie Schardt (schar005@mc.duke.edu) from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Angela Myatt (angela.myatt@unc.edu) of the University of Cincinnati. (Schardt/Myatt)
INLS 890-164: Scholarly Communication
This course is geared toward individuals who are interested in working in academic libraries, building or managing digital collections of scholarly materials, and/or conducting research on scholarly communication practices (i.e., master's paper research, doctoral dissertations, and beyond). We address (1) how scholars across academic disciplines approach their research and scholarly work (including reading behaviors, the selection of 'interesting' research problems/questions, writing and publication practices, and research
evaluation) (2) the characteristics of relevant social relationships in academic settings (such as faculty-student mentoring, laboratory work, the structure of schools/departments, and 'invisible colleges'); (3) perspectives of external stakeholders--publishers, colleges and universities, libraries, and scholarly/professional societies--who support the scholarly communication system; (4) current and potential impacts of emerging authoring/sharing technologies (e.g., blogs, wikis, reference and data management tools, social networking sites) and venues (e.g., open access journals, 'open notebook science', subject-based or institutional repositories) upon scholarly work practices.
The primary learning outcome of the course will be preparing students to engage in sophisticated inquiry--some may think of this as 'research', others might think of this as collecting evidence to support the design of systems, services, and programs--around practical aspects of the scholarly communication system within a particular work context. Assignments will be structured to accommodate diverse student interests: some students may ultimately choose to prepare a proposal for education, advocacy, or programming related to scholarly communication issues; others may choose to prepare a design proposal for a new system or service; and still others may choose to write a research proposal to study certain aspects of the process. (Edwards, homepage)
Summer 2009
INLS 490-036: Ethnography, Web 2.0, and LIS
This course explores the communication, collaboration, and learning that occurs, and that can be studied, in libraries and information institutions. Libraries, schools, and organizations that rely on production and circulation of knowledge are discussed with regard to the impact Web 2.0 technologies have had on these institutions. The course focuses on how individuals and groups within these information contexts communicate and learn using social media and collaborative technology. Qualitative research tools, such as ethnography and participant observation, are explored as are the technology landscapes, such as online social networks, that dominate these new spaces. (Daniel/Taylor)
890-166: Readers Advisory and Adult Programming
Public libraries and other cultural institutions continue to be sources of pride and providers of unstructured learning opportunities in small and large communities throughout the United States. This course explores the reading, recreational, and viewing interests of adults in a wide selection of these settings and the knowledge, tools, and methods used to develop advisory services and educational programs that correspond to their information needs and reading preferences (Arns)
Spring 2009
INLS 490-040: What is Information?
Information in humans, especially language and knowledge. A seminar that explores how others have studied the basic issues in philosophy of language and epistemology, discussing how information exists in these different contexts. Some discussion of the economic value of information for people.
What is information? (Losee)
INLS 490-089: Issues in digital Video Retrieval
This course addresses the growing importance of digital video in work, education, and leisure. Principles and techniques for finding digital video, reusing video, and creating new video are considered with emphasis on creating and using surrogates that support retrieval and reuse. (Marchionini)
INLS 490-121: Library 2.0
This course will explore the premise and the promise of so-called Web 2.0 technologies for libraries and other information organizations and services. The principles of Web 2.0 will be explored, and specific Web 2.0-style tools and technologies that may be used in libraries and other information organizations will be used and critiqued (e.g., tools to harness explicit and implicit collective intelligence, mass amateurization, mashups, self-publication). It will be considered whether the philosophy of Web 2.0 is compatible with the profession of librarianship and the information professions as currently construed at all. (Pomerantz)
INLS 490-154: Information Retrieval Systems Design and Implementation
Tools for organizing and accessing information have become indispensable. It is critical, therefore, to understand their design and operational foundations. In this course students will have an opportunity to learn about search engines, web crawling, and some Web 2.0 technologies based on hands-on experience and with a focus on techniques that can be used to access, retrieve, organize, and present information. Students will work with practical developmental tools and learn relevant concepts through experimentation. For instance, students will employ an open source search engine and learn about indexing, retrieving, and ranking techniques.
Prerequisites:
Students are expected to have previous exposure to some programming (C, Java, Perl, or PHP). Basic programming experience acquired in an introductory programming course such as INLS 490-153 or in some professional settings is recommended. (Shah)
INLS 490-153: Programming
Prerequisites: INLS 572 or familiarity with the structure of HTML and the Web. Knowledge of some programming and SQL will also be useful. The course covers the fundamentals of PHP server-side scripting, including variables, arrays, flow control, functions etc., and Web-related issues such as forms, session management, cookies, authentication of users and so on. (Song)
INLS 490-151: Online Social Networks
This is a course about how we realize, negotiate, use and understand social networks in an ICT context. As humans, we are connected by social networks; the ties between us and our friends, family, coworkers, etc., creates these networks; they are organic and highly dynamic and pervade all of our encounters. We will be approaching social networks from an Information Science standpoint. We will seek to understand how humans form social networks in information tools, how these social networks are articulated, how we use these social networks to determine things like relevance and network power, and how our future of ubiquitous technology will be highly social. (Stutzman)
INLS 490-161: iRODS Rules Construction (1 credit course)
This class will prepare students to adapt existing rules and develop new rules to support the management of digital repositories and curation of digital collections. The rules will be developed for the Integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS), which is designed to be infrastructure-independent, in order to support interoperability and long-term preservation. Previous experience with programming will be very helpful but is not required. Topics covered will include: an introduction to iRODS; introduction to micro-services; the format of iRODS rules; rule invocation; composing workflows; defining conditions for rules; passing arguments between micro-services; control micro-services; deferred operations; invocation of web services; querying the metadata catalog (iCat); iRODS modules for micro-service organization; and rules for controlling third-party software. (Lee, Marciano, Moore, Rajasekar)
INLS 890-122: Evidence Based Discovery
One theme that permeates the evidence-based discovery is the need to bring together disciplines, both by generating textual summaries of bibliographically disjoint literatures automatically and by fostering an environment that supports information flow between disciplines. This course combines theoretical models from discovery science, with a survey of informatics tools that support discovery. The seminar will show-case the discovery process via a lecture series comprising both discipline and policy champions listed below and thus reveal the synergy between synthesis and discovery and the need for interdisciplinary collaboration. (Blake)
INLS 890-123: Research Design
(Kelly)
INLS 890-092: Seminar in Knowledge Organization
Fundamental questions: What is knowledge? Why and how do we develop knowledge organization systems? What are the implications of knowledge organization systems and approaches?
This class explores theoretical foundations, historical approaches, and current practices for organizing knowledge. The class will encompass a wide-range knowledge organization systems, from general terminological and classificatory schemes to domain specific semantic systems, including thesauri, taxonomies, and ontologies. An emphasis will be on research advancing our philosophical understanding of knowledge organization and theoretical and practical implications for this topic in the digital world.

Several selected topics covered include Aristotle--reality and knowledge; Baconian classification; Linnaean taxonomy; Dewey--whole world approach for KO; Ranganathan--analytico-synthetic classification and facet analysis; the Semantic Web; and metadata.

The course is a seminar and will emphasize reading and class discussion. Deliverables will include reporting on assigned topics and a *final* project, paper, annotated bibliography, or research plan that contributes to larger research effort.
(Pre-requisites: INLS 520, 521, 720, or instructor's permission). (Greenberg)
INLS 890-087: Communication Skills for Information Professionals
This course seeks to develop students' ability to communicate effectively. The emphasis is on the skills necessary to communicate orally, in writing, and in digital environments. By the end of the course, students should have a better sense of how they communicate, where their strengths and weaknesses are, and how to improve their abilities to maximize the persuasive and informational power of their performances. (Sturm)
INLS 890-096: Evidence-based Library and Information Practice
Evidence-based practice (EBP) is being adopted by a variety of professions as a way of identifying and using the best available research evidence for decision making. As such, EBP can be seen as a tool for linking research to practice and promoting innovation and change. This course will explore the origins of evidence-based practice in general and its current application in library and information science. Students will have an opportunity to explore the state of EBP in a number of fields and to discuss the applicability of the concept to LIS. Based on this exploration, the class participants will have the opportunity to participate in an LIS research project that is generating evidence that can be apply to practice. (Marshall)
INLS 890-160: Managing InformationTechnologies for Libraries
Today academic, public, school, and special libraries alike depend on information technologies (IT) to deliver services and support operations. In this course we'll become familiar with the workings of systems and technologies common in today's libraries, consider the role of IT in supporting library success, and develop transferable project management skills. Topics include integrated library systems (ILS), next generation search and discovery systems, electronic resources and related systems, the role of open source solutions in library automation, and the library technology marketplace. Emphasis will be placed on management issues including system selection, project planning, and assessing the effectiveness of technology solutions in meeting library goals. Though this course will cover technical topics, an advanced technical background is not required. (Rodriguez)
 
Fall 2008
INLS 490-078: Seminar in Personal Information Management
Personal Information Management (PIM) is the study of how people organize and manage information in their daily lives, including to-do lists, calendars, email, address books, and file management. In today's digital age, many devices including cell phones, computers, PDAs, and music players play a role in PIM. This course will focus on major issues in PIM research, including information organization, human cognitive and memory issues, task continuity across devices, mental models of information, usability issues, and the role of technology in PIM. The course will be structured as a readings and discussion seminar with a semester-long research project. Students will become familiar with current PIM research and will design and implement a research study of PIM. Students will also prepare "a day in the life of my PIM" presentations to share aspects of their own personal information management techniques and challenges and to stimulate classroom discussion. (Barreau/Capra)
INLS 490-122: Programming
Prerequisites: INLS 572 or familiarity with the structure of HTML and the Web. Knowledge of some programming and SQL will also be useful. The course covers the fundamentals of PHP server-side scripting, including variables, arrays, flow control, functions etc., and Web-related issues such as forms, session management, cookies, authentication of users and so on. (Blake)
INLS 490-138: International Children's Literature

In today’s world, knowledge and understanding of other cultures is increasingly crucial.
A society’s traditions, values, and aspirations are often reflected in and shaped by its children’s literature. This course will survey contemporary children’s books from around the globe. By comparing and contrasting ideas and images in children’s literature from Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, North America, South America and Australia, students will expand their appreciation for the similarities and differences between cultures, helping to promote a climate of tolerance and acceptance. (Pease)

INLS 490-151: Computer Mediated Communication
The web is a place of communication, interaction and relational management. From Ray Tomlinson's first email in 1971, to the iChats, Wall posts and Twitters of today, we have consistently turned to the network to find one other for communication and collaboration. This course explores computer mediated communication (CMC) from a relational perspective; that is, how do we use network communication tools to start, build or sustain interpersonal relationships. Utilizing interdisciplinary perspectives including, but not limited to, information science, communications and science and technology studies, we will explore the theoretical, practical and historical perspectives on the role networked communications tools play in the relational process. Students who successfully complete this course will develop critical perspectives on networked communications, better preparing them to develop the communication tools of the future. The course will be structured as a seminar, with substantial reading and discussion. In addition to presentations, students will be expected to develop hands-on experience with the communication tools of the past, present and future. (Stutzman)
INLS 490-154: IR Systems: Design and Evaluation
Tools for organizing and accessing information have become indispensable. It is critical,
therefore, to understand their design and operational foundations. In this course students will have an opportunity to learn about search engines, web crawling, and some Web 2.0 technologies based on hands-on experience and with a focus on techniques that can be used to access, retrieve, organize, and present information. Students will work with practical developmental tools and learn relevant concepts through experimentation. For instance, students will employ an open source search engine and learn about indexing, retrieving, and ranking techniques.
Prerequisites
Students are expected to have previous exposure to some programming (C, Java, Perl, or
PHP). Basic programming experience acquired in an introductory programming course such as INLS 490-153 or in some professional settings is recommended. (Mostafa/Shah)
INLS 490-01W: Evidence-based Management
Leaders who practice evidence-based management seek out the best evidence
available and commit to fact-based decision making. This course will
provide students an interactive, hands-on opportunity to develop the
analytical and research skills required to practice evidence-based
management. Through readings, class discussion, cases studies, multimedia
presentations, and simulation software, students will work individually and
in teams to use evidence to identify, analyze and solve management problems
particularly in the areas of library and technology management. (Weiss)
INLS 890-03W: Evidence Based Medicine
This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based Medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. In particular, the role of the librarian in the practice of EBM will be covered. The course runs for 7 consecutive weeks. It will take a total of approximately 30 hours to complete the course (plus the final project), depending on previous knowledge of EBM and other factors. Instructors are Connie Schardt (schar005@mc.duke.edu) from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Angela Myatt (angela.myatt@unc.edu) of the University of Cincinnati. (Schardt/Myatt)
INLS 890-096: Evidence-based Library and Information Practice
Evidence-based practice (EBP) is being adopted by a variety of professions as a way of identifying and using the best available research evidence for decision making. As such, EBP can be seen as a tool for linking research to practice and promoting innovation and change. This course will explore the origins of evidence-based practice in general and its current application in library and information science. Students will have an opportunity to explore the state of EBP in a number of fields and to discuss the applicability of the concept to LIS. Based on this exploration, the class participants will have the opportunity to participate in an LIS research project that is generating evidence that can be apply to practice. (Marshall)
INLS 890-123: Interactive Information Retrieval
The course explores various interactive information retrieval systems including traditional document retrieval systems, multimedia retrieval systems, question answering systems, and recommender and filtering systems. The course also explores personalization technologies, such as user models and profiles. The historical development of systems and their evaluation will be emphasized. Students will be encouraged to consider the nature of the relationship between library and information science and among theory, research and practice.
This course is primarily a readings course and most of the readings will be research-based. Students will be expected to write several short papers during the course of the semester integrating, comparing and applying the readings. The final project will consist of an extensive literature review and synthesis OR a research proposal.
This course is appropriate for Ph.D. students and Master's students who have completed at least one semester of study. For Master's students completion of INLS 500 is required. This course is appropriate for both MSIS and MSLS students.
This course complements Information Retrieval (INLS 509) and the Seminar in Human Computer Interaction; its content is focused on the intersection of the two. (Kelly)
INLS 890-141: Understanding Information Technology for Managing Digital Collections
The fundamental motivation for this course is that anyone responsible for digital collections will have to understand and be conversant in various aspects of the associated information technologies, in order to evaluate the work of developers, delegate tasks, write appropriate requests for proposals (RFPs), establish reasonable management and preservation policies. These are essential skills for many information professionals, even if they never sit at a command line or do any of the implementation themselves.
You're not required to have any specific prerequisite technical knowledge to take the course. In fact, if you feel somewhat out of your element when the "IT people" start throwing around jargon, this could be a great class for you. By the end of the class, you should be ready to dive right into discussions of bit streams, file systems, file formats,
and character encoding. (Lee)
INLS 890-144: Leadership
(Winston)
Spring 2008
INLS 490-123: Web Search and Interaction
The course provides an overview of the field of information retrieval (IR), with a focus on Web-based applications and information search interactions. The historical development of IR, Web search engines and other Web-based IR applications such as recommender and filtering systems will be explored. Basic principles of search technology will be presented, including searching algorithms, ranking functions and user feedback. This course will also consider the relationship between users' online information search behaviors and search functionality. (Kelly)
INLS 490-127: Information Architecture
Information architecture (IA) is a rapidly evolving field dealing with the human-centered design of web sites. IA uses knowledge from the diverse fields of design, information science, computer science, and social science to create digital interfaces which are enjoyable, logical and simple to use. This course will cover site analysis, organization of information, web technologies, indexing and abstracting, taxonomies and classification schemes, marketing and graphical design. Activities will include content analysis, competitive analysis, user research, development of personas and scenarios, card sorting heuristics, creation of deliverables such as site blueprints and wireframes. (Fenton)
INLS 490-144: Project Management: Strategy and Practice
The course focuses on the nature and increasing importance of the project management function in addressing organizational priorities, in settings ranging from corporations, libraries and archives, to colleges and universities, and other not-for-profit organizations. The course will address the documented use of project management across functional areas and the documented need for project management knowledge and skills in a range of professions and specialties.
Topics associated with the project life cycle, from project identification and pre-planning through project sponsorship, project budgeting and financial management, and project evaluation will be covered. We will focus on issues of stakeholder management, the use of information and communication technology in project management, customer involvement, and the human side of projects. Based on the principles of project management, organizational behavior, and leadership, issues of organizational change, decision making, and communication will be central to the course. (Winston/Brody)
INLS 490-151: Online Social Networks
This is a course about how we realize, negotiate, use and understand social networks in an ICT context. As humans, we are connected by social networks; the ties between us and our friends, family, coworkers, etc., creates these networks; they are organic and highly dynamic and pervade all of our encounters. We will be approaching social networks from an Information Science standpoint. We will seek to understand how humans form social networks in information tools, how these social networks are articulated, how we use these social networks to determine things like relevance and network power, and how our future of ubiquitous technology will be highly social. (Stutzman)
INLS 490-153: Programming
Prerequisites: INLS 572 or familiarity with the structure of HTML and the Web. Knowledge of some programming and SQL will also be useful. The course covers the fundamentals of PHP server-side scripting, including variables, arrays, flow control, functions etc., and Web-related issues such as forms, session management, cookies, authentication of users and so on. (Song)
INLS 490-156: Theory and Practice of Multi-user Virtual Environments
This course is an in-depth study of various theoretical aspects of multi-user virtual environments (MUVE). Topics such as avatarian presence, proflection in cyberspace, the nature of immersive experience, and resource discovery in 3-D synthetic worlds will be explored. The modeling, texturing and animation skills necessary to create content in the "Second Life" MUVE will be taught using tools embedded in the Second Life user interface as well as open-source software such as GIMP, Blender, and Avimator. Students will also learn how to script 3-D objects using the Linden Scripting Language (LSL). (Taylor)
INLS 890-03W: Evidence Based Medicine
This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based Medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. In particular, the role of the librarian in the practice of EBM will be covered. The course runs for 7 consecutive weeks. It will take a total of approximately 30 hours to complete the course (plus the final project), depending on previous knowledge of EBM and other factors. Instructors are Connie Schardt (schar005@mc.duke.edu) from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Angela Myatt (angela.myatt@unc.edu) of the University of Cincinnati. (Schardt/Myatt)
INLS 890-046: Digital Curation: Applications and Challenges
Explores a range of issues central to digital curation and trustworthy repositories including history and definition of digital curation; lifecycle management of digital assets; digital collection building; codifying relationships and agreements with contributors and partner institutions; audit and certification; standards development; related aspects of organizational behavior; project and risk management; preservation strategies; policy setting and external policies relevant to repository management. (Tibbo/Lee)
INLS 890-087: The Child's Introduction to Reading
This course introduces students to the process of reading development and the resources available to early childhood educators, parents, and caregivers to facilitate this development, with an emphasis on print materials. The course is designed to help students explore the wealth of literature for the pre-reader and early reader, and it includes an examination of board books, easy non-fiction (i.e. concept books about shapes, colors, the alphabet, etc.), picture books, Mother Goose, leveled beginning reader books (i.e. I Can Read, etc.), and transitional chapter books. This course will be of interest to those pursuing children's librarianship and early childhood education. (Sturm)
INLS 890-096: Consumer Health Information
This course will examine the growing need for access to health information for the public in the context of federal and state policy initiatives such as Healthy People 2010. The World Health Organization defines health as a complete state of physical, mental and social well-being and not simply the absence of disease. The course will examine concepts of health and illness from various cultural and social perspectives as a basis for designing print and digital health information collections and services to serve diverse user groups. Through the major assignment, students will have an opportunity to focus on a particular health topic of interest. The course will challenge students to think creatively about how to improve health status at the individual, community and global levels though the provision of information services. (Marshall)
INLS 890-120: Copyright Law in the Digital Age
(Klinefelter/Gerhardt)
INLS 890-138: International Children's Literature
In today's world, knowledge and understanding of other cultures is increasingly crucial. A society's traditions, values, and aspirations are often reflected in and shaped by its children's literature. This course will survey contemporary children's books from around the globe. By comparing and contrasting ideas and images in children's literature from Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, North America, South America and Australia, students will expand their appreciation for the similarities and differences between cultures, helping to promote a climate of tolerance and acceptance. The text used in this course will be Lehman, Barbara and Freeman, Evelyn: Global Perspectives in Children's Literature (ISBN# 0205308627, Allyn & Bacon, 136 pages). (Pease)
INLS 890-146: Evidence-based Library and Information Practice
Evidence-based practice (EBP) is being adopted by a variety of professions as a way of identifying and using the best available research evidence for decision making. As such, EBP can be seen as a tool for linking research to practice and promoting innovation and change. This course will explore the origins of evidence-based practice in general and its current application in library and information science. Students will have an opportunity to explore the state of EBP in a number of fields and to discuss the applicability of the concept to LIS. Based on this exploration, the class participants will have the opportunity to participate in an LIS research project that is generating evidence that can be apply to practice. (Marshall)
INLS 890-154: Enabling Usability of Cyberinfrastructure for Learning, Inquiry and Discovery
This course is an opportunity for deep reflections on cyberinfrastructures. We will spend time attempting to understand and define the area of cyberinfrastructure and explore its roots in other key scholarly information technologies. We will take a close look at current scholarly practices, in terms of three critical stages, namely learning, inquiry, and discovery, and how they are related to and (potentially?) served by cyberinfrastructures. We will also explore the influence of cyberinfrastructure services on conventional information resources and services (including those managed and mediated by humans). The following topics will be covered in the class:
  • Origin of the concept and its relation to scholarly information tools, technologies, and services
  • Proposed and implemented cyberinfrastructure architectures and their rationale
  • Nature of data and data management operations in typical cyberinfrastructure environments
  • Scholarly services supported by cyberinfrastructures and their implementations
  • Key technologies that make cyberinfrastructures work: remote sensing, steering, and measuring, simulations, distributed databases, data mining, web services, high dimensional and interactive visualizations, and collaboratories
We plan to study developments in the area of cyberinfrastructure with a critical perspective, particularly focusing on the impact on usability and significant challenges in expanding the usage of cyberinfrastructures. Students will be expected to read articles and books related to this area, engage in discussions (and debates), and produce a research paper at the end of the term. We will also arrange demonstrations of relevant cyberinfrastructure tools and technologies. (Mostafa)
Fall 2007
INLS 490-148: Information Strategies for Prospect Research & Fundraising
Libraries and other non-profit organizations must all face the task of finding resources outside of internal budgets. Library and non-profit managers are frequently faced with development responsibilities without a formal skill set. This course will serve as an introduction to basic fundraising principles, tools for prospect research (in-depth biographical research), and an introduction to data mining for fundraising. The course may introduce the student to a potential career path in non-profit information management. (Monnig)
INLS 490-151: Online Social Networks
This is a course about how we realize, negotiate, use and understand social networks in an ICT context. As humans, we are connected by social networks; the ties between us and our friends, family, coworkers, etc., creates these networks; they are organic and highly dynamic and pervade all of our encounters. We will be approaching social networks from an Information Science standpoint. We will seek to understand how humans form social networks in information tools, how these social networks are articulated, how we use these social networks to determine things like relevance and network power, and how our future of ubiquitous technology will be highly social. (Stutzman)
INLS 890-03W: Evidence Based Medicine
This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure--call no. 86276) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based Medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. In particular, the role of the librarian in the practice of EBM will be covered. The course runs for 7 consecutive weeks. It will take a total of approximately 30 hours to complete the course (plus the final project), depending on previous knowledge of EBM and other factors. Instructors are Connie Schardt (schar005@mc.duke.edu) from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Angela Myatt (angela.myatt@unc.edu) of the University of Cincinnati. (Schardt/Myatt)
INLS 890-040: Seminar on Information: Physical Sciences
A seminar examining "information" as proposed by scholars in a range of disciplines in the physical, computational, and mathematical sciences. (Losee)
INLS 890-122: Text Mining
The first 1/3 of the semester will follow a lecture and discussion format where Dr. Blake will introduce key concepts and approaches for knowledge discovery, data mining and text mining. The second 1/3 of the semester will comprise recent papers that are drawn from current literature in text mining. This semester will over-sample research in Multiple-Document Summarization. Dr. Blake will tailor the last 1/3 of the semester to articles pertinent to student projects.
The course is project based, where each student will identify and complete the entire knowledge discovery process in an area of their choosing. The primary deliverable for the course is a student project. Small programming and database assignments may be assigned if required. Active participation in class discussion is expected of all students.
Prerequisites: Databases (Introduction to databases and concepts) or equivalent professional experience, or permission by the instructor. Programming proficiency will be helpful but is not required. (Blake)
INLS 890-123: Interactive Information Retrieval
The course explores various interactive information retrieval systems including traditional document retrieval systems, multimedia retrieval systems, question answering systems, and recommender and filtering systems. The course also explores personalization technologies, such as user models and profiles. The historical development of systems and their evaluation will be emphasized. Students will be encouraged to consider the nature of the relationship between library and information science and among theory, research and practice.
This course is primarily a readings course and most of the readings will be research-based. Students will be expected to write several short papers during the course of the semester integrating, comparing and applying the readings. The final project will consist of an extensive literature review and synthesis OR a research proposal.
This course is appropriate for Ph.D. students and Master's students who have completed at least one semester of study. For Master's students completion of INLS 500 is required. This course is appropriate for both MSIS and MSLS students.
This course complements Information Retrieval (INLS 509) and the Seminar in Human Computer Interaction; its content is focused on the intersection of the two. (Kelly)
INLS 890-126: XML
XML is everywhere, even though you may not notice it much. Technologies like RSS, AJAX, and SVG are changing the way the Web works. XML is used in business to business communication, publishing, data storage, document formats, and many, many other areas. This class will cover the basics of XML's rules and syntax and then go on to explore related topics like XHTML, RSS, AJAX, OpenDocument, SVG, transforming XML, printing XML, XML for documents, and XML for data. Students should have a basic knowledge of HTML and web page creation, including CSS. Database and scripting experience would be useful, but is not required. (Cayless)
INLS 890-131: Principles and Practice in Archival Description
Explores the principles of archival description as expressed in Describing Archives: A Content Standard. Implementation of those principles through Encoded Archival Description (EAD) and MARC structures will form the largest portion of the semester. Other practices will include authority and subject analysis work. Other topics, issues, and technologies include related standards, the history and development of archival description, the uses of description, and description for special formats. Pre-requisite: INLS 556. Recommended: INLS 521. (Wisser)
Summer 2007
INLS 490-149: The Role of the Book in Information Society
The course will analyze the role of the book in contemporary societies. Their focus will be on cultural, political, demographic and economic factors that determine usage of books and on differences among ways on which people access books in various developed societies throughout Europe, USA and Asia. The course will also look on changes that took place in book industry due to development of information technologies and on relation between the book and other media in digital age. The course will conclude with an overview on the role of book in knowledge societies. (Kovac)
INLS 490-117: Information Architecture
Information architecture (IA) is a rapidly evolving field dealing with the human-centered design of web sites. IA uses knowledge from the diverse fields of design, information science, computer science, and social science to create digital interfaces which are enjoyable, logical and simple to use. This course will cover site analysis, organization of information, web technologies, indexing and abstracting, taxonomies and classification schemes, marketing and graphical design. Activities will include content analysis, competitive analysis, user research, development of personas and scenarios, card sorting heuristics, creation of deliverables such as site blueprints and wireframes. (Fenton)
INLS 890-131: Principles and Practices in Archival Description
Explores the principles of archival description as expressed in Describing Archives: A Content Standard. Implementation of those principles through Encoded Archival Description (EAD) and MARC structures will form the largest portion of the semester. Other practices will include authority and subject analysis work. Other topics, issues, and technologies include related standards, the history and development of archival description, the uses of description, and description for special formats. Pre-requisite: INLS 556. Recommended: INLS 521. (Wisser)
Spring 2007
INLS 890-03W: Evidence Based Medicine
This eight-week course is designed as an introduction for medical librarians to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Practicing EBM means combining clinical expertise, the preferences and values of the patient and the best available evidence to make good patient care decisions.
Schardt/Myatt
INLS 890-046: Access, Outreach, and Public Service in Cultural Heritage Repositories
This class will focus on determination of user needs, information seeking behaviors, and provision of access to primary source materials in archives, manuscript repositories, and museums. Students will design and conduct a user study in a local repository, analyze various databases and access tools, and assess remote access and web presence for a number of different types of repositories. User education will be a major focus of the class.
Tibbo
INLS 890-087: The Child's Introduction to Reading
This course introduces students to the process of reading development and the resources available to early childhood educators, parents, and caregivers to facilitate this development, with an emphasis on print materials. The course is designed to help students explore the wealth of literature for the pre-reader and early reader, and it includes an examination of board books, easy non-fiction (i.e. concept books about shapes, colors, the alphabet, etc.), picture books, Mother Goose, leveled beginning reader books (i.e. I Can Read, etc.), and transitional chapter books. This course will be of interest to those pursuing children's librarianship and early childhood education.
Sturm
INLS 890-096: Consumer Health Information
This course will examine the growing need for access to health information for the public in the context of federal and state policy initiatives such as Healthy People 2010. The World Health Organization defines health as a complete state of physical, mental and social well-being and not simply the absence of disease. The course will examine concepts of health and illness from various cultural and social perspectives as a basis for designing print and digital health information collections and services to serve diverse user groups. Through the major assignment, students will have an opportunity to focus on a particular health topic of interest. The course will challenge students to think creatively about how to improve health status at the individual, community and global levels though the provision of information services.
Marshall
INLS 890-136: Legal Information
Special topic on legal information.
Childs
INLS 890-138: International Children's Literature
In today's world, knowledge and understanding of other cultures is increasingly crucial. A society's traditions, values, and aspirations are often reflected in and shaped by its children's literature. This course will survey contemporary children's books from around the globe. By comparing and contrasting ideas and images in children's literature from Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, North America, South America and Australia, students will expand their appreciation for the similarities and differences between cultures, helping to promote a climate of tolerance and acceptance.
Pease
INLS 890-144: Leadership in Theory and Practice
Special topic on leadership.
Winston
INLS 890-145: Art Librarianship
Special topic on art librarianship.
Thompson/Bauer
INLS 890-146 Library Effectiveness
Increasingly librarians are being called upon to evaluate the services they provide by measuring not only inputs and outputs but also outcomes and the overall impact of the library on the community. This course will examine the program evaluation model, the program logic model and techniques that have been used to determine the value and impact of library services. Students will have the opportunity to design a library evaluation using a mixed methods approach that draws on both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis techniques. The evaluation of innovations in library service will be emphasized using the Lifelong Access Libraries initiative of the Americans for Libraries Council as an exemplar.
Marshall
 
INLS 890-150: Seminar in Digital Curation
Seminar explores range of issues central to digital curation and trustworthy repositories including appraisal, audit and certification, standards, metadata, intellectual property rights, risk management, preservation strategies, and reuse of data. Student interest will determine specific focus of class.
Tibbo

Fall and Spring 2006
INLS 490-096
Explores, selects, and evaluates resources and services for various types of libraries and information settings. The course covers CHI's evolution, trends, projections, related technology issues and the impact of CHI on different segments of society (i.e., older adults, persons with specific illnesses).
Marshall
INLS 890-126
XML is everywhere, even though you may not notice it much. Technologies like RSS, AJAX, and SVG are changing the way the Web works. XML is used in business to business communication, publishing, data storage, document formats, and many, many other areas. This class will cover the basics of XML's rules and syntax and then go on to explore related topics like XHTML, RSS, AJAX, OpenDocument, SVG, transforming XML, printing XML, XML for documents, and XML for data. Students should have a basic knowledge of HTML and web page creation, including CSS. Database and scripting experience would be useful, but is not required.
Cayless
INLS 110-02W
Potential Description: Libraries and other non-profit organizations must all face the task of finding resources outside of internal budgets. Library and non-profit managers are frequently faced with development responsibilities without a formal skill set. This course will serve as an introduction to basic fundraising principles, tools for prospect research (in-depth biographical research), and an introduction to data mining for fundraising. The course may introduce the student to a potential career path in non-profit information management.
INLS 110-122 Text Mining
Prerequisites : Databases (156 or equivalent), and programming proficiency, or permission by the instructor
Objectives:
1. Develop a general understanding of knowledge discovery, and a specific understanding of text mining
2. Gain experience with both the theoretical and practical aspects of knowledge discovery
3. Critique current literature in text mining
Motivation:
Changes in technology and publishing practices have eased the task of recording and sharing information electronically. The quantity of information has spurred the development of a new field called Knowledge Discovery. This course will provide a conceptual overview of the Knowledge process which has been described as the "the nontrivial process of identifying valid, novel, potentially useful, and ultimately understandable patterns in data (Fayyad,Piatetsky-Shapiro, and Smyth 1996).
I have partitioned the course into two parts. The first part will introduce the KD process and show the application of that process on structured data. The second part will explore the application of the KD process to textual information resources. In both cases I will draw examples from a variety of applications in particular health and bio-informatics.
Blake
INLS 110-139
Information Policy: An examination information access, with a focus on government information and government regulation of information. Topics include legal issues, policy considerations, freedom of information and privacy. Geared toward librarians and information professionals interested in understanding what information is made available, to whom, and why.
INLS 210-03W Intermediate Selected Topics: Evidence-Based Medicine and the Medical Librarian (3)
This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure--call # 86276) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based Medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. In particular, the role of the librarian in the practice of EBM will be covered. The course runs for 7 consecutive weeks. It will take a total of approximately 30 hours to complete the course (plus the final project), depending on previous knowledge of EBM and other factors. Instructors are Connie Schardt (schar005@mc.duke.edu) from the Duke University Medical Center Library and Angela Myatt(angela.myatt@unc.edu) of the University of Cincinnati
INLS 210-034 Intermediate Selected Topics: Copyright Law for Librarians (3)
This course examines the law of copyright, its increasing importance to society and its impact on libraries, education and research. The course also focuses on the difficulties the digital environment imposes on traditional copyright doctrines, pressures from publishers and produces to increase copyright protection and the increasing globalization of intellectual property protection.
Gasaway
INLS 210-046 Archival Appraisal. Pre-requisite 145.
This course will explore what has been termed the archivist's "first" and arguably most important responsibility, appraisal. Students will investigate the theories, techniques, and methods that archivists use to identify documents and other materials of enduring value for long-term preservation. Students will study the history of appraisal and compare contemporary approaches from around the globe and study the work of various repositories.
Tibbo
INLS 210-078 Intermediate Selected Topics: Information Communication Technologies, Organizations, and Knowledge Management: (3)
The personal and social aspects of information communication technology (ICT) use in the workplace may bring about both positive and problematic effects for organizations and the individuals working with them. Through examination of the literature and completion of class projects, we will explore these aspects of ICTs and ways organizations might utilize them effectively to support the work tasks of individual workers and the knowledge management needs of the organization.
Barreau
INLS 210-112 Intermediate Selected Topics: Archival Approaches to Content Management (3)
This seminar draws on basic archival principles to develop ways of understanding the management of digital content from three different perspectives: digital files as surrogates of original source materials; Web content delivery systems; and repositories for digital preservation. Working with case studies from ongoing research and development projects within an international context, participants focus on emerging standards, ranging from the Open Archival Information System reference standard to XML schema for repository construction and the exposure of metadata to third-party harvesters. Team based projects and critical assessments of an emerging technical literature support the testing and evaluation of a series of content management software applications.
Conway
INLS 210-119 Intermediate Selected Topics: Intermediate Topics in Databases (3) Pre-requisite: permission of instructor. Examines the context of databases and allows students the opportunity to explore issues raised in previous database classes in more detail. Issues, topics, and technologies covered will include advanced database administration; an introduction to both data warehousing tools and techniques and data mining principles; rights management, implementation policies and practices and other legal and ethical issues; data quality control and data security.
Chaffin
INLS 210-131 Intermediate Selected Topics: Principles and Practices in Archival Description (3)
Pre-requisite: INLS 145 Recommended:INLS 151. Explores the principles of archival description as expressed in Describing Archives: A Content Standard Implementation of those principles through Encoded Archival Description (EAD) and MARC structures will form the largest portion of the semester. Other practices will include authority and subject analysis work. Other topics, issues, and technologies include related standards, the history and development of archival description, the uses of description, and description for special formats.
Wisser/Holdzkom
INLS 210-137 Leadership in Theory and Practice
The course addresses leadership theory, principles and practices, particularly emphasizing feminist theory and leadership diversity theory. Considers the nature of leadership roles at all levels in organizations, the roles of leaders in fostering organizational success, and the recurring professional and leadership issues within the national and international structure of library and information science. We will focus on theories of leadership and the practical application of leadership theory in the management of libraries and information service organizations. Emphasis will be placed on the self-awareness of leaders, leadership roles and opportunities, leadership development, and leadership evaluation.
Winston
INLS 210-138 The Art of the Picture Book
This course will study the art of creating a picture book: the integration of words and images into a complete whole. It will explore the role of writers, artists, designers, publishers, and the media in engaging the reader’s imagination. Students will learn how picture books have contributed to the culture of childhood from the late 19th century to the present. Through discussion and hands-on experiences with the concepts and techniques of visual thinking, students will evaluate the contemporary state-of-the-art, and the relationship of picture books to other forms of sequential storytelling such as film, comics, and animation.
Pease
INLS 310-040 Optimal Informative Systems
Information and informative systems (broadly construed). Optimality. Evolutionary processes and evolution. Intentional design, decision making, and games.
Losee
INLS 310-052 Advanced Selected Topics: Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis: (3)
This course will combine seminar and practicum to introduce students to intensive approaches to qualitative data collection and analysis to support research and/or design within the information field. Students in the class will learn about qualitative methods and apply them in a situation or situations of their own choice (e.g., research to understand information related behavior in context; groundwork for applications development to identify requirements, constraints, and design opportunities). Topics likely to be covered include: questions/problems/proposals; role of theory (input/output); ethics; planning; entry; data collection strategies: observation, interviewing, and content analysis; trustworthiness vs. validity/reliability of data; data analysis approaches; and reporting of the results.
Solomon
INLS 310-089 Advanced Selected Topics: Seminar in Human Computer Interaction Retrieval: (3)
Classical information retrieval had yielded novel techniques for applying computers to retrieval problems, including WWW search engines. The classical model of retrieval is one of matching queries to documents and ranking these matches. In the case of Web IR, the matching has become more dependent on anchor text in webpages and the evaluation less practical for recall and precision measures. It is apparent, however, that a new model of retrieval is needed as people access large-scale digital libraries of multimedia content and vast collections of unstructured data in the WWW. What is needed are ways to bring human intelligence and attention more actively into the search process. To this end, researchers are beginning to combine the lessons from designing highly interactive user interfaces with the lessons from human information behavior to create new kinds of search systems that depend on continuous human control of the search process. I call this hybrid approach to the challenges of information seeking, human computer interaction (HCIR). HCIR aims to empower people to explore large-scale information bases but demands that people also take responsibility for this control by expending cognitive and physical energy. This seminar will consider the underlying theoretical model for HCIR, some early designs that aim to support such interactions, and alternative evaluation paradigms. Students will read papers and lead discussions based on those papers, and work on a group project to design and pilot test a user study for an HCIR system.
Marchionini
 

Fall 2005
INLS 110-127 Intermediate Selected Topics: Visual Communication and Design
Fenton, 3 credits
Introduction to visual communication design with an emphasis on creating usable and effective information interfaces for Internet and computer applications. Course includes an overview of visual communication techniques, graphic design history and theory, hands-on exploration of design basics, information architectures and visual display of information.
INLS 210-03W Intermediate Selected Topics: Evidence-Based Medicine and the Medical Librarian
Schardt/Myatt, 3 credits
This course may be taken either for credit (through the normal University registration procedure--call #86276) or 10 CEUs (continuing education units) from the Medical Library Association (as a UNC Continuing Education offering via the SILS Office). This course is designed as an introduction to the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Evidence-based Medicine promotes the use of the scientific literature in the clinical decision making process. EBM specifically addresses issues of developing good clinical questions; identifying reliable resources and effective searching strategies; and evaluating the quality of research studies. In particular, the role of the librarian in the practice of EBM will be covered. The course runs for 7 consecutive weeks. It will take a total of approximately 30 hours to complete the course (plus the final project), depending on previous knowledge of EBM and other factors.
INLS 210-096 Evidence Based Information Practice
Evidence-based practice is being adopted by a variety of health and other professions as a quality improvement mechanism that makes use of the best available research evidence for decision making. This course will explore the application of evidence-based practice in both library and other information practice settings. Students will have the opportunity to review existing models from other fields and to discuss their applicability to EBIP. A framework for EBIP will be developed and students will have the opportunity to apply the framework to an area of information practice in which they have a particular interest. In addition to the research literature, the students will be encouraged to think about how best library and information management practices could contribute to EBIP.
Textbook: Andrew Booth and Anne Brice, eds. Evidence based information practice. 2004.
Marshall, 3 credits
INLS 210-052, Practical Metadata
This course will center on a research project to test a metadata language constructed by NC ECHO to bring together disparate metadata records for museum, libraries, and archives. This course will explore the challenges of constructing a testing plan, crosswalking metadata, relevancy and precision and recall measurements, and providing effective representation for cultural heritage materials in an online environment. Course will focus on group problem solving methods mirroring the real world environment. Class will meet weekly to discuss individual accomplishments, research, and review the plan. Students interested in database design, metadata, cultural heritage institutions, and information retrieval, and hands-on active learning are encouraged to enroll. Limited to five students. By permission of instructor.
Solomon, 3 credits
INLS 210-046, Intermediate Selected Topics: Access, Outreach, and Public Service in Cultural Heritage Repositories
Tibbo, 3 credits
This class will focus on determination of users' needs, information seeking behaviors, and provision of access to primary source materials in archives, manuscript repositories, and museums. Students will design and conduct a user study in a local repository, analyze various databases and access tools, and assess remote access and web presence for a number of different types of repositories. User education will be a major focus of the class.
INLS 310-040 What is Information?
Losee, 3 credits

Summer 2005 (Session I)
INLS 110-117: Information Architecture
Crystal, 3 credits
We are drowning in information: a weekday edition of The New York Times contains more information than the average person was likely to come across in a lifetime in 17th century England. As a result, we are often unable to locate, analyze or use the information we need. Information architecture is an emerging interdisciplinary practice that attacks this problem. Information architects are skilled in the art and science of structuring and classifying information spaces to help people find and manage information. This course will draw on insights from information science and human-computer interaction research, as well as the experience of practitioners, to prepare you to tackle challenging problems in information architecture. Prerequisite: INLS 50 or 102 or permission of instructor.