Scanning

The SILS lab has a variety of scanners that can be used to scan text documents and photos as follows: 

Scanning a photo

You can scan a photo using either Windows Fax and Scan or Adobe Photoshop.

Using Windows Fax and Scan:
  1. Press the power button on the scanner to turn it on.

  2. Lift the scanner cover and place the image to be scanned face-down on the plate glass.

  3. Go to Start → All Programs → Windows Fax and Scan.

  4. Click the New Scan button and make any desired adjustments to the scan settings.

  5. Click the Scan button to begin the scan.

  6. After the scan is complete, you can save the file in a variety of formats including BMP, JPEG, GIF, TIFF and PNG.

Using Adobe Photoshop:
  1. Press the power button on the scanner to turn it on.

  2. Lift the scanner cover and place the image to be scanned face-down on the plate glass.

  3. Go to Start → All Programs → Adobe Design and Web Premium CS6 → Adobe Photoshop CS6.

  4. From the toolbar, select File → Import → WIA Support... → Start → WIA-hp scanjet 8200 series (or EPSON Expression 11000XL, depending on the scanner selected).

  5. A dialog called What do you want to scan? will pop up.

    • Depending on the scanner, you may need to choose the correct paper source, whether your image is lying on the flatbed or in the feeder on top of the scanner.

  6. Choose what type of photo you are scanning.

  7. Click Adjust the quality of the scanned picture. The Advanced Properties dialog will appear.

  8. Choose your preferred Resolution. 300 DPI is the lowest resolution needed to print clearly, and is great for the screen. However, 600 DPI and above are best for printing and for archival use, though the output files are usually larger. If you are only scanning this document for the web, the resolution can be as low as 72 DPI.

  9. Change the Brightness and Contrast as you see fit.

  10. Click OK.

  11. If all the other settings look good, click Scan. Photoshop will import the photo.

  12. When scanning is complete, you can then manipulate the image as you see fit. Be sure to save your file when you are finished.

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Scanning a text document - Book

  1. Press the power button on the scanner to turn it on.

  2. Lift the scanner cover and place the image to be scanned face-down on the plate glass.

  3. Double-click Adobe Acrobat X Pro on the Desktop.

  4. From the toolbar, select Create -> PDF from Scanner and then select your document type from the options given (color, black and white, etc.).

  5. (Optional) Choose Custom Scan for advanced options.

    • From the Scanner dropdown menu, select WIA-hp scanjet 8200 series (or EPSON Expression 11000XL, depending on the scanner selected).

    • Choose your preferred Color Mode. For text documents, you will likely want to choose grayscale.

    • Select your Resolution. 300 DPI is the lowest resolution needed to print clearly, and is great for the screen. However, 600 DPI and above are best for printing and for archival use, though the output files will be larger.

    • Under the Text Recognition and Metadata section, make sure Make Searchable (Run OCR) is selected.

    • If all other settings look good to you, select Scan.

    • If your document is more than one page long, remove the current page and insert the next page into the scanner, then select Tools -> More Insert Options -> Insert from Scanner and again select your document type. You can choose to insert the new page either before or after the current one.

  6. Acrobat will now scan the page. You will be prompted to scan more pages. If there are no more pages to your document, select "Scan is Complete."

  7. Select the Tools button at the top right of your scanned document. Here you will be able to rotate, crop, etc.

  8. When you are finished scanning all your documents, be sure you have saved your document before exiting!

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Scanning a text document - Loose pages

To scan a set of loose pages into a single PDF, use either of the scanners located in the center aisles of the SILS ITRC.
  1. Press the power button on the scanner to turn it on.

  2. Place the pages to be scanned in the feeder tray (face-down using the Fujitsu scanner, face-up using the HP scanner).

  3. Double-click Adobe Acrobat X Pro on the Desktop.

  4. From the toolbar, select Create -> PDF from Scanner.

  5. Choose Custom Scan.

    • From the Scanner dropdown menu, select WIA-hp scanjet 8200 series (or FUJITSU fi-6140Zdj, depending on the scanner selected).

    • Choose whether you want to scan both sides of each page, or just the front side.

    • Set your preferred Color Mode. For text documents, you will likely want to choose grayscale.

    • Select your Resolution. 300 DPI is the lowest resolution needed to print clearly, and is great for the screen. However, 600 DPI and above are best for printing and for archival use, though the output files will be larger.

    • Under the Text Recognition and Metadata section, make sure Make Searchable (Run OCR) is selected.

    • If all other settings look good to you, select Scan.

  6. Select the Tools button at the top right of your scanned document. Here you will be able to rotate, crop, etc.

  7. When you are finished scanning all your documents, be sure you have saved your document before exiting!

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Scanning an oversized document

For oversized/very large documents, Use the XL scanner located in the corner closest to the glass-walled Laboratory for Network Information.
  1. Press the power button on the scanner to turn it on.

  2. Lift the scanner cover and place the image to be scanned face-down on the plate glass.

  3. Double-click Adobe Acrobat X Pro on the Desktop.

  4. From the toolbar, select Create -> PDF from Scanner and then select your document type from the options given (color, black and white, etc.).

  5. (Optional) Choose Custom Scan for advanced options, including Optical Character Recognition.

    • From the Scanner dropdown menu, select EPSON Expression 11000XL.

    • Choose your preferred Color Mode. For text documents, you will likely want to choose grayscale.

    • Select your Resolution. 300 DPI is the lowest resolution needed to print clearly, and is great for the screen. However, 600 DPI and above are best for printing and for archival use, though the output files will be larger.

    • Under the Text Recognition and Metadata section, make sure Make Searchable (Run OCR) is selected.

    • If all other settings look good to you, select Scan.

    • If your document is more than one page long, remove the current page and insert the next page into the scanner, then select Tools -> More Insert Options -> Insert from Scanner and again select your document type. You can choose to insert the new page either before or after the current one.

  6. Acrobat will now scan the page. You will be prompted to scan more pages. If there are no more pages to your document, select "Scan is Complete."

  7. Select the Tools button at the top right of your scanned document. Here you will be able to rotate, crop, etc.

  8. When you are finished scanning all your documents, be sure you have saved your document before exiting!

If you need more help scanning, just let a lab assistant know! We are here to help.

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Optical Character Recognition: The Process

Optical Character Recognition (OCR) converts scanned images into text. It works well on most 20th-century and 19th-century typefaces. With earlier printed material, or with poor reproductions of any typeface, the OCR software begins to encounter time-consuming obstacles. Broken letters, ligatures, digraphs, uneven inking, and antiquated letterforms may be unrecognized by the software, and each unrecognized character adds time to the proofing and correction stage of your project.

Try a test scan before going ahead with any large amount of text. A little experimenting at first can result in a lower error rate (and therefore less to correct in proofreading). Your results should be good with most modern type faces, but even with clean text of a decent type size there will be occasional errors; this error rate increases as the text's size and clarity decreases. Altering the brightness and resolution can improve results, but little can be done with a badly faded photocopy or a 17th or 18th century typeface.

Anything that disrupts the integrity of the letter's shape can be a potential cause of an error, although the software has some ability to compensate. Breaks in letters (and sometimes ornate italics) can cause what you will come to recognize as distinctive OCR errors -- a d getting read as cl, a 1 or ! as l, an m as in, or an e as c.

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