New Books - May, 2009

New books for the week of 18 May, 2009

SILS Collection

Altree, Ann & June Palmer. Treasures of the Morrab: a Penzance library that has more than books. Penzance: Penwith Local History Group, 2005.

Basole, Rahul C. Enterprise mobility: applications, technologies and strategies. Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Washington, DC: IOS Press, 2008.

Griebel, Rolf & Klaus Ceynowa. Information, Innovation, Inspiration: 450 Jahre Bayerische Staatsbibliothek. München: Saur, 2008.

Heijden, Hans van der. Designing management information systems. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.


Sauers, Michael P. Searching 2.0. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2009.

Sauers, Technology Innovation Librarian for the Nebraska Library Commission, provides a guide for librarians, including beginners, that demonstrates effective strategies for integrating new Web 2.0 tools and technologies into their daily duties. He discusses the structure of Web 2.0 and its effects on searching, and tools such as bookmarking, tagging, and Delicious; the features and functions of search engines like Google and Yahoo! Search; Wikipedia; and online multimedia content like Youtube, Flickr, and Podscope. Other chapters cover maps, Google's Book Search, resources for finding historical information using the Google cache or the Wayback Machine, OpenSearch plug-ins and desktop search tools, and cutting-edge search engines. Screen shots and instructions are incorporated, and all links to resources are available on the companion website.


Juvenile Collection

Alalou, Elizabeth; Ali Alalou; & Julie Klear Essakalli. The butter man. Watertown, MA: Charlesbridge, 2008.

Becker, Bonny & Kady MacDonald Denton. A visitor for Bear. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press, 2008.

Caletti, Deb. The fortunes of Indigo Skye. New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2008.

Coville, Bruce & John Clapp. The prince of butterflies. Orlando: Harcourt, 2007.


Cutbill, Andy & Russell Ayto. The cow that laid an egg. New York, NY: HarperCollins, 2008.

Marjorie the cow wishes she had a special talent. One morning, thanks to a bunch of scheming chickens, Marjorie discovers that she's laid an egg. But does the baby inside the egg belong to Marjorie? Emotions soon run high in this hilarious farmyard tale. Full color.


Foley, Greg. Don't worry Bear. New York: Viking, 2008.

Immaculée, Uwimana. Ubutungutungu. Kigali: Editions Bakame, 2004.

Lachtman, Ofelia Dumas & Alex Pardo DeLange. Pepita talks twice = Pepita habla dos veces. Houston, Tex.: Piñata Books, 1995.

Betsy Lewin, Ted & Betsy Lewin. Horse song: the Naadam of Mongolia. New York: Lee & Low Books, 2008.

Manushkin, Fran & Holly Berry. How Mama brought the spring. New York: Dutton Children's Books, 2008.


Ray, Deborah Kogan. Wanda Gág: the girl who lived to draw. New York, N.Y.: Viking, 2008.

Wanda Gág (pronounced "Gog") is well known as the author and illustrator of Millions of Cats, one of the best-loved children's books ever published. But not many people know how interesting and inspiring her life was.Following in the footsteps of her beloved artist father, Wanda led an idyllic childhood, drawing and listening to old-world fairy tales. But when her father died, it was teenage Wanda who worked hard to keep her seven younger siblings fed, clothed, and laughing. She never lost sight of her love of art, however, and her tremendous willpower won her a coveted scholarship to the Art Students League in New York City and then led to a gallery show of her artwork - where an editor of children's books got an idea for a book. The rest, as they say, is history!


Shusterman, Neal. Antsy does time. New York, NY: Dutton Children's Books, 2008.

Fueled by friendship and sympathy, Antsy Bonano signs a month of his life over to his "dying" classmate Gunnar Umlaut. Soon everyone at school follows suit, giving new meaning to the idea of "living on borrowed time." But does Gunnar really have six months to live, or is news of his imminent death greatly exaggerated? When a family member suffers a heart attack after donating two years to Gunnar, Antsy wonders if he has tempted fate by playing God. Fans of "the Schwa" will welcome favorite and new characters in this wholly fresh tale, which is as touchingly poignant as it is darkly comical.


Venkatraman, Padma. Climbing the stairs. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2008.

Graphic Novels

None.

New books for the week of 11 May, 2009

SILS Collection

McDonald, Peter D. The literature police: apartheid censorship and its cultural consequences. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.

McNulty, Scott. Building a WordPress blog people want to read. Berkeley, Calif.: Peachpit; London: Pearson Education, 2009.

Peck, Penny. Crash course in storytime fundamentals. Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, 2009.

Sanchez, Elaine. Emerging issues in academic library cataloging & technical services. New York, N.Y.: Primary Research Group, 2007.

Striphas, Theodore G. The late age of print: everyday book culture from consumerism to control. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.

Juvenile Collection

Amato, Mary & Delphine Durand. The chicken of the family. New York, NY: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2008.

Averbeck, Jim & Tricia Tusa. In a blue room. Orlando, Fla.: Harcourt, 2008.

Bolden, Tonya. George Washington Carver. New York: Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2008.

Broach, Elise & Kelly Murphy. Masterpiece. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 2008.

Capaldi, Gina. A boy named Beckoning: the true story of Dr. Carlos Montezuma, Native American hero. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda Books, 2008.

Fleischman, Sid. The entertainer and the dybbuk. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books, 2008.

George, Jessica Day. Sun and moon, ice and snow. New York: Bloomsbury, 2008.


George, Madeleine. Looks. New York: Viking, 2008.

This unforgettable debut novel tells a provocative story that explores the ways in which girls use food and their bodies to say what they cannot.


Greenberg, Jan & Sandra Jordan. Christo and Jeanne-Claude: through the Gates and beyond. New York: Roaring Brook Press, 2008.

Harmon, Michael. The last exit to normal. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2008.


Hernandez, David. Suckerpunch. New York: HarperTeen, 2008.

Its the summer before senior year and Marcus should be hanging out, filling his sketchbook, and asking a girl out for once. So why is he, his brother, and his brothers girlfriend riding in a car towards his dads with a pistol?


Jenkins, A. M. Night road. New York: HarperTeen, 2008.

For a heme like Cole, life is a tightrope existence in which sunlight is his deadly enemy and one mistake could trap him underground, staring at the inside of a coffin lid, for eternity. After a century of wandering he may still look like a teenager, but he's known in the heme community for being observant, meticulous, and controlled-a master of life on the road. When Cole is asked to take a newly created heme out for training, however, his usual caution may not be enough. If Gordon, the rookie who really is in his teens, can't cut ties with his old life and accept his new limitations, Cole will have to discreetly dispose of the kid-the same way a mad dog would be put down for the safety of society. Cole thinks he can handle it. But no matter how carefully he plans, or how much he thinks he's in control, accidents still happen. . . .


Mayer, Robert H. When the children marched: the Birmingham civil rights movement. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, 2008.

Mazer, Norma Fox. The missing girl. New York: HarperTeen, 2008.

McDonald, Megan & Brian Floca. The Hinky Pink: an old tale. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2008.

McDonald, Megan & Joung Un Kim. Hen hears gossip. New York: Greenwillow Books, 2008.

Nivola, Claire A. Planting the trees of Kenya: the story of Wangari Maathai. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2008.

O'Brien, Tony & Mike Sullivan. Afghan dreams: young voices of Afghanistan. New York: Bloomsbury Children's Books, 2008.

Ormerod, Jan & Lindsey Gardiner. Over in the clover. New York: Barron's Educational Series; 2009.

Preller, James. Six innings: a game in the life. New York: Feiwel and Friends, 2008.

Schmidt, Gary D. Trouble. New York: Clarion Books, 2008.

Scott, Elizabeth. Stealing Heaven. New York: HarperTeen, 2008.


Stone, Tanya Lee & Rebecca Gibbon. Elizabeth leads the way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the right to vote. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 2008.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton stood up and fought for what she believed in. From an early age, she knew that women were not given rights equal to men. But rather than accept her lesser status, Elizabeth went to college and later gathered other like-minded women to challenge the right to vote. Here is the inspiring story of an extraordinary woman who changed America forever because she wouldn't take "no" for an answer.


Tharp, Tim. The spectacular now. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 2008.

Turner, Pamela S. A life in the wild: George Schaller's struggle to save the last great beasts. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2008.


Valentine, Jenny. Me, the missing, and the dead. New York: HarperTeen, 2008.

Me: Lucas Swain-I'm nearly sixteen years old and live in London. I was fairly normal until the night I found Violet. Then everything changed. The Missing: Dad. He disappeared five years ago. Nobody knows what happened to him, and nobody cares except me. It's enough to drive you crazy. The Dead: That's Violet . . . in the urn. Speaking of crazy-I know she's trying to tell me something, and I think it's about my father. . . . A dead lady may not be much to go on, but my dad's out there somewhere, and it's up to me to find out where.


Watkins, Steve. Down Sand Mountain. Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2008.

Wendel, Tim & José Luis Villegas. Far from home: Latino baseball players in America. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society, 2008.

Wukovits, John F. Booker T. Washington and education. Detroit: Lucent Books, 2008.

Yum, Hyewon. Last night. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008.

Graphic Novels

None.

New books for the week of 4 May, 2009

SILS Collection

Austin, Robert D.; Richard L. Nolan; & Shannon O'Donnell. The adventures of an IT leader. Boston, Mass.: Harvard Business Press, 2009.

Fredericks, Anthony D. American folklore, legends, and tall tales for readers theatre. Westport, Conn.: Teachers Idea Press, 2008.

Karle, Elizabeth M. Hosting a library mystery: a programming guide. Chicago: American Library Association, 2009.

Mathews, Brian. Marketing today's academic library: a bold new approach to communicating with students. Chicago: American Library Association, 2009.

Russell, Ralph Ernest. A comparative study of faculty library committee functions in five liberal arts colleges. Tallahassee: Florida State University, 1973.

Third symposium on Human factors in information systems: a forum for the exchange of ideas, conceptual work, and empirical research in the area of human factors in information systems. S.l.: s. n., 1990.

Treviño, Rose Zertuche. Read me a rhyme in Spanish and English = Léame una rima en español e inglés. Chicago: American Library Association, 2009.

Juvenile Collection


Almond, David & Dave McKean. The savage. Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2008.

Mysterious and utterly mesmerizing, this graphic-novel-within-a-novel pairs the extraordinary prose of David Almond with the visual genius of Dave McKean. Blue Baker is writing a story ? not all that stuff about wizards and fairies and happily ever after ? a real story, about blood and guts and adventures, because that's what life's really like. At least it is for Blue, since his dad died and Hopper, the town bully, started knocking him and the other kids around. But Blue's story has a life of its own ? weird and wild and magic and dark ? and when the savage pays a nighttime visit to Hopper, Blue starts to wonder where he ends and his creation begins.


Aronson, Marc & Patty Campbell. War is...: soldiers, survivors, and storytellers talk about war. Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2008.

In a provocative anthology, two editors with opposing viewpoints present an unflinching collection of works reflecting on the nature of war. Marc Aronson thinks war is inevitable. Patty Campbell thinks war is cruel, deceptive, and wrong. But both agree on one thing: that teens need to hear the truthful voices of those who have experienced war firsthand. The result is this dynamic selection of essays, memoirs, letters, and fiction from nearly than twenty contributors, both contemporary and historical ? ranging from Christian Bauman's wrenching "Letter to a Young Enlistee" to Chris Hedges's unflinching look at combat to Fumiko Miura's Nagasaki memoir, "A Survivor's Tale." Whether the speaker is Mark Twain, World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle, or a soldier writing a miliblog, these divergent pieces look war straight in the face ? and provide an invaluable resource for teenagers today.


Booth, Coe. Kendra. New York: PUSH, 2008.


Bowman, Robin. The American teenager. New York: Umbrage Editions, 2007.

Robin Bowman's five-year journey into the heart of teenage America created a series of 414 "collaborative portraits," wherein she shares her discoveries of a generation now coming of age. In searing and intimate photographs, presented alongside the young people's voices of passion, pride, embarrassment, lust, pain, bewilderment, anxiety, joy, uncertainty, and rage, the book charts the coming of age of the largest generation in America-77 million strong-in every region of the country and every socioeconomic group: from a Texas debutante to teenage gang members in New York City, from a drag queen in Georgia to a coal miner in West Virginia. Bowman's intimate photographs ask us to reconcile preconceived ideas and stereotypes of teenagers with the diversity of individuals in the portraits. This book and the traveling exhibition it accompanies are about the inside lives of these kids and how they see their reality in their own voices.


Erdrich, Louise. The porcupine year. New York, NY: HarperCollinsPublishers, 2008.

Geerling, Marjetta. Fancy white trash. New York: Viking, 2008.

Harris, Robie H. & Michael Emberley. Maybe a bear ate it! New York: Orchard Books, 2008.

Hijuelos, Oscar. Dark Dude. New York, NY: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2008.

Hopkinson, Deborah & John Hendrix. Abe Lincoln crosses a creek: a tall, thin tale (introducing his forgotten frontier friend). New York: Schwartz & Wade Books, 2008.

Johnson, Maureen. Suite Scarlett. New York: Point, 2008.


Lester, Julius. Guardian. New York: Amistad/HarperTeen, 2008.

There are times when a tree can no longer withstand the pain inflicted on it, and the wind will take pity on that tree and topple it over in a mighty storm. All the other trees who witnessed the evil look down upon the fallen tree with envy. They pray for the day when a wind will end their suffering. I pray for the day when God will end mine. In a time and place without moral conscience, fourteen-year-old Ansel knows what is right and what is true. But it is dangerous to choose honesty, and so he chooses silence. Now an innocent man is dead, and Ansel feels the burden of his decision. He must also bear the pain of losing a friend, his family, and the love of a lifetime. Coretta Scott King Award winner and Newbery Honoree Julius Lester delivers a haunting and poignant novel about what happens when one group of people takes away the humanity of another.


Link, Kelly & Shaun Tan. Pretty monsters: stories. New York: Viking, 2008.

Marillier, Juliet. Cybele's secret. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2008.

McNamee, Graham. Bonechiller. New York: Wendy Lamb Books, 2008.

Murphy, Pat. The wild girls. New York, N.Y.: Viking, 2007.


Napoli, Donna Jo. Hush: an Irish princess' tale. New York, N.Y.: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2007.

Melkorka is a princess, the first daughter of a magnificent kingdom in medieval Ireland -- but all of this is lost the day she is kidnapped and taken aboard a marauding slave ship. Thrown into a world that she has never known, alongside people that her former country's laws regarded as less than human, Melkorka is forced to learn quickly how to survive. Taking a vow of silence, however, she finds herself an object of fascination to her captors and masters, and soon realizes that any power,no matter how little, can make a difference. Based on an ancient Icelandic saga, award-winning author Donna Jo Napoli has crafted a heartbreaking story of a young girl who must learn to forget all that she knows and carve out a place for herself in a new world -- all without speaking a word.


Nobleman, Marc Tyler & Ross MacDonald. Boys of steel: the creators of Superman. New York: A.A. Knopf, 2008.

JERRY SIEGEL AND Joe Shuster, two misfit teens in Depression-era Cleveland, were more like Clark Kent?meek, mild, and myopic?than his secret identity, Superman. Both boys escaped into the worlds of science fiction and pulp magazine adventure tales. Jerry wrote stories, and Joe illustrated them. In 1934, they created a superhero who was everything they were not. It was four more years before they convinced a publisher to take a chance on their Man of Steel in a new format?the comic book. The author includes a provocative afterword about Jerry and Joe?s long struggle with DC Comics when they realized they had made a mistake in selling all rights to Superman for a mere $130! Marc Tyler Nobleman?s text captures the excitement of Jerry and Joe?s triumph, and the energetic illustrations by Ross MacDonald, the author-artist ofAnother Perfect Day, are a perfect complement to the time, the place, and the two young visionaries.


Padian, Maria. Brett McCarthy: work in progress. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2008.

Brett McCarthy lives for soccer, vocabulary words, and her larger-than-life grandmother, Nonna. Unfortunately, Brett?s got a huge mouth she can?t seem to tame and opinions she can?t keep to herself. It?s thanks in part to both of those things (well, really, the evil Jeanne Anne) that Brett finds herself going from good student and BFF to Diane, to twice suspended, friendless, and lunching with the principal every day. Indefinitely. So when Nonna starts going for lots of medical tests and no one will tell her why, Brett?s already turned-upside down world goes from bad to worse, and she?s not sure where she fits, who she is, or how to make right what she, and her big fat mouth, have made wrong. Maria Padian makes her literary debut with a laugh-out-loud coming-of-age novel about one smart-mouthed 14-year-old who?s learning the hard way that she is a work in progress.


Parker, David L. Before their time: the world of child labor. New York: Quantuck Lane Press: Distributed by W.W. Norton, 2007.

Reinhardt, Dana. How to build a house. New York: Wendy Lamb Books, 2008.

Schumacher, Julie. Black box: a novel. New York: Delacorte Press, 2008.

Scott, Elizabeth. Living dead girl. New York: Simon Pulse, 2008.

Sendak, Maurice. Where the wild things are. New York, N.Y.: Harper Collins Publishers, 1991, 1984.


Shields, Charles J. I am Scout: the biography of Harper Lee. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 2008.

"To Kill a Mockingbird "is one of the most widely read novels in American literature. It's also a perennial favorite in high school English classrooms across the nation. Yet onetime author Harper Lee is a mysterious figure who leads a very private life in her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, refusing to give interviews or talk about the novel that made her a household name. Lee's life is as rich as her fiction, from her girlhood as a rebellious tomboy to her days at the University of Alabama and early years as a struggling writer in New York City. Charles J. Shields is the author of the "New York Times "bestseller "Mockingbird: A Portrait of Harper Lee," which he has adapted here for younger readers.What emerges in this riveting portrait is the story of an unconventional, high-spirited woman who drew on her love of writing and her Southern home to create a book that continues to speak to new generations of readers. Anyone who has enjoyed "To Kill a Mockingbird "will appreciate this glimpse into the life of its fascinating author.


Smith, Andrew. Ghost medicine. New York: Feiwel and Friends, 2008.

Smith, Roland. Elephant run. New York: Hyperion Books for Children, 2007.


Tanaka, Shelley & David Craig. Amelia Earhart: the legend of the lost aviator. New York: Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2008.

The ever-fascinating story of the legendary pilot is given new life in this vividly told true-life adventure. Ever since Amelia Earhart and her plane disappeared on July 2, 1937, people have wanted to know more about this remarkable woman.Amelia Earhart follows the charismatic aviator from her first sight of an airplane at the age of ten to the last radio transmission she made before she vanished. Illustrated with original artworks, contemporary photographs, quotes, and details, this is a great introduction to the famous pilot. The book includes a bibliography and an index.


Woodson, Jacqueline. After Tupac & D Foster. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2008.

Zarr, Sara. Sweethearts: a novel. New York: Little, Brown and Co., 2008.

Zepeda, Gwendolyn & April Ward. Growing up with tamales = Los tamales de Ana. Houston, TX: Piñata Books, 2008.

Graphic Novels

None.

 

New books for the week of 27 April, 2009

SILS Collection

Academic library cataloging practices benchmarks. New York: Primary Research Group, 2008.

Ford, Andrew. Apache 2 pocket reference. Sebastopol, Calif.: O'Reilly, 2008.

Morgan, Pamela J. Training paraprofessionals for reference service: a how-to-do-it manual for librarians. New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2009.

Juvenile Collection

Bartoletti, Susan Campbell. The boy who dared. New York: Scholastic Press, 2008.

Bee, William. Beware of the frog. Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2008.

Benway, Robin. Audrey, wait! New York: Razorbill, 2008.


Brothers, Meagan. Debbie Harry sings in French. New York: Henry Holt, 2008.

Johnny's had kind of a tough life so far, and he's always been a bit of a freak. His goth look usually includes black nail polish and a little mascara.When he discovers Debbie Harry, the lead singer of Blondie, he not only likes her music but realizes that he kind of, sort of, wants to BE her. He'd like to be cool and tough and beautiful like her. He'd like to dress like her. He's not gay, at least he doesn't think so. So what does it mean? And what should he tell his amazing new girlfriend? This wise, hip novel introduces shades of gray into the black-and-white ideas of sexuality and gender. Anyone who has ever wished they could be a little bit tough and a little bit glamorous will recognize themselves in Johnny.


Brown, Don. All stations! distress!: April 15, 1912, the day the Titanic sank. New York: Flash Point/Roaring Brook Press, 2008.

THE "UNSINKABLE" MEETS THE UNTHINKABLE -- A gripping account of the ill-fated maiden voyage of the Titanic. It took 4,000 men to build it, 23 tons of animal grease to slide it into the ocean, 100,000 people to wave bon voyage, but only one wrong move to tear the Titanic apart, sinking it into the pages of history. On a cold moonless night in April of 1912, 2,000 passengers--both the uber-rich enjoying a luxury cruise and the dirt-poor hoping to find a new life in America--struggled to survive. Only 700 succeeded. Lifeboats were launched half-full; women were forced to leave their husbands and sons behind; and even those who made it out alive were forever haunted, constantly wondering "why me?" Told through captivating prose and chilling first-hand accounts, Don Brown take the pieces of the broken Titanic and gives it such a vivid shape that you'd swear you've never heard the story before.


Bunce, Elizabeth C. A curse dark as gold. New York, NY: Arthur A. Levine Books, 2008.


Campbell, Sarah C. & Richard P. Campbell. Wolfsnail: a backyard predator. Honesdale, Pa.: Boyds Mills Press, 2008.


Dowd, Siobhan. Bog child. Oxford, UK: New York, NY: David Fickling Books, 2008.

Fleming, Denise. Buster goes to Cowboy Camp. New York: Henry Holt, 2008.

Hills, Tad. What's up, Duck?: a book of opposites. New York: Schwartz & Wade Books, 2008.

Juby, Susan. Another kind of cowboy. New York: HarperTeen, 2007.

Monninger, Joseph. Baby. Asheville, N.C.: Front Street, 2007.

Peña, Matt de la. Mexican whiteboy. New York: Delacorte Press, 2008.

Selection of folktales from ASEAN and China. Jarkarta: ASEAN Secretariat, 2006.

Smith, Charles R., Jr. & Noah Z. Jones. Dance with me. Cambridge, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2008.

Voorhees, Coert. The brothers torres. New York, N.Y.: Hyperion, 2008.

Graphic Novels


Allie, Scott. The Dark Horse book of hauntings: eight uncanny tales of spirit manifestations, apparitions, and otherworldly horrors-- told in words and pictures: also, seance medium L.L. Dreller orates upon his occult gift, peculiar stories from beyond. Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Comics, 2003.


Allie, Scott. The Dark Horse book of monsters: seven potent tales of monstrosity and doom told in words and pictures: including the sea-borne menaces of William Hope Hodgson. Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Books, 2006.


Allie, Scott. The Dark Horse book of the dead: nine cautionary tales of the risen and hungry dead, told in words and pictures; including famously dead author and patriarch of terrifying adventure, Robert E. Howard. Milwaukie, Or.: Dark Horse, 2005.


Allie, Scott. The Dark Horse book of witchcraft: eight weird mysteries of powerful women and supernatural skill-- told in words and pictures: also, high priestess Phyllis Currott reveals the wisdom of witchcraft: tales of magic and splendor. Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse Books, 2004.


Hale, Shannon; Dean Hale; & Nathan Hale. Rapunzel's revenge. New York, N.Y.: Bloomsbury, 2008.


Kibuishi, Kazu. Amulet. New York: Graphix, 2008.

After the tragic death of their father, Emily and Navin move with their mother to the home of her deceased great-grandfather, but the strange house proves to be dangerous. Before long, a sinister creature lures the kids' mom through a door in the basement. Em and Navin, desperate not to lose her, follow her into an underground world inhabited by demons, robots, and talking animals. Eventually, they enlist the help of a small mechanical rabbit named Miskit. Together with Miskit, they face the most terrifying monster of all, and Em finally has the chance to save someone she loves.