Professor Sandra Hughes-Hassell elected to lead YALSA

Release date: 

May 17, 2016

Sandra Hughes-Hassell, Professor at the UNC School of Information and Library Science (SILS), has been elected to the 2016-19 Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) Board of Directors as President-Elect. A division of the American Library Association (ALA), YALSA works to support library staff in alleviating the challenges teens face and in putting all teens on the path to successful and fulfilling lives.

“It is an honor to be elected,” Hughes-Hassell said. “As president, I will work with the YALSA board of directors, members, and staff to continue envisioning the future of library services for teens.”

Hughes-Hassell has been active with the organization for many years, previously serving on the board from 2011-2014 and as editor of YALSA’s Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (JRLYA). She also co-authored the YALSA publication titled “The Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action,” which has served as the basis of a new three-year organizational plan.

“The Futures Report was only the beginning of an ongoing conversation about how libraries can best meet the needs of all teens and I’m excited to be part of this,” Hughes-Hassell said. “I also want to focus on how YALSA can build the capacity of its members as leaders in advocating for libraries and the teens they serve.” 

Hughes-Hassell is also passionate about continuing YALSA’s efforts to improve library access for underserved communities. “This includes providing teen librarians and other library staff with the knowledge and skills necessary to engage with all teens equitably and powerfully, in ways that connect with and affirm their individual and cultural identities,” she said.

In April, Hughes-Hassell was awarded a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to develop “Project READY: Reimagining Equity and Access for Diverse Youth–A Professional Development Curriculum,” which will help school librarians to become more culturally competent educators.