SILS alumna Cassidy Sugimoto to deliver Henderson Lecture focusing on gender disparities in scholarly communication

Release date: 

August 4, 2016

Dr. Cassidy R. Sugimoto (MSLS ’07, Ph.D. ’10), alumna of the UNC School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and Associate Professor at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University Bloomington, will deliver the 2016 Lucile Kelling Henderson Lecture on Monday, October 3, at 3 p.m. in the Pleasants Family Room of Wilson Library. The lecture, hosted by SILS, is free and open to the public. A brief reception will follow.

Cassidy R. Sugimoto

Sugimoto’s talk, titled “‘What Does it Matter Who is Speaking?’ Disparity and Disruption in Scholarly Communication,” will explore who gets a voice in scholarly communication and how these voices are acknowledged. Specifically, the talk will examine gender disparities in scholarly communication, with a particular emphasis on metrics of production, impact, and innovation.

Analyses of novel forms of authorship will be presented, with a focus on what they can reveal about gender differences in the construction of science.  Empirical results on altmetrics will be shown to demonstrate the potential of social media to broaden the understanding of participation and reward in science communication.

The talk will close with a discussion of the implications of these disparities and disruptions and the role of various stakeholders—scholars, librarians, publishers, and science policy makers—in building the requisite infrastructure to support this changing ecosystem while avoiding goal displacement in science.

About Dr. Cassidy Sugimoto

Sugimoto conducts research within the domain of scholarly communication and scientometrics, examining the formal and informal ways in which knowledge is produced, disseminated, and consumed. She has published nearly 70 journal articles on this topic and has presented at numerous conferences. She has edited and co-edited (with Blaise Cronin) monographs on novel metrics in scholarly communication (Beyond Bibliometrics, MIT Press), critical informetrics (Scholarly Metrics Under the Microscope, Information Today), and theories of informetrics and scholarly communication (de Gruyter Mouton). Her most recent edited work (with Hamid Ekbia and Michael Mattioli) examines big data in various contexts (MIT Press).

Her work has received funding from the National Science Foundation, Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the Sloan Foundation, among other organizations. Sugimoto is actively involved in teaching and service and has been rewarded in these areas with an Indiana University Trustees Teaching award (2014) and a national service award from the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) (2009). She was President of the Faculty at Indiana University Bloomington (2015-16) and is currently serving as President of the International Society of Scientometrics and Informetrics.