Heather McCullough

Title:

Associate Director for Instructional Programs

Employer:

Center of Teaching and Learning, UNC Charlotte

Degree:

MSIS

Graduation year:

2007
"My time at SILS inspired me to think about how knowledge is created, expressed, and shared in different contexts."

Heather McCullough is the Associate Director for Instructional Programs at the Center of Teaching and Learning at UNC Charlotte. She leads the instructional programs staff and implements the major instructional programs, large-scale instructional projects, and new initiatives offered by the center.

Her recent collaborations with the Office of Distance Education have included offering programming to guide faculty in the development and delivery of hybrid and online courses and support for Quality Matters, a faculty-centered, peer review process that is designed to certify the quality of online and blended courses.

In addition to her MSIS from UNC, McCullough holds a Ph.D. in French Literature from Indiana University. She has taught French and English at the university level in the U.S. and France and worked in the field of instructional technology and pedagogical support for over 10 years. She previously served as Head of Research Services and Digital Scholarship in the J. Murrey Atkins Library. She is past Co-Editor in Chief for the International Association of Language Learning Technology Journal and a former reviewer for the Educause Review Online. She completed the Leading Change Institute in 2013, and was selected as a Institute of Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (IELOL) 2016 fellow.

As an alumnus of SILS, MuCullough maintains a great appreciation for the SILS program and faculty. 

"They were always available to talk about projects and ideas, even after I graduated," she relates. "They took an interest in students and were fine teachers. The program was flexible enough to allow me to tailor it to my professional interests and yet still be very cohesive as a program. My time at SILS inspired me to think about how knowledge is created, expressed, and shared in different contexts."