Grants & Awards

Dr. Rob Capra receives NSF award to develop better systems to support complex online searches

(January 2016) Dr. Rob Capra, Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science (SILS), has received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award to support his research for the next five years on a project titled “Knowledge Representation and Re-Use for Exploratory and Collaborative Search.”


Professor Paul Jones receives IBM Faculty Award

(July 2015) Paul Jones, director of ibiblio and clinical professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and the School of Media and Journalism, has received a 2015 IBM Faculty Award for $20,000. The funds will help support a project titled “Keeping the Historic Web Alive and Accessible: Preserving and Serving.”


Dr. Zeynep Tufekci named Andrew Carnegie Fellow

(April 2015) Zeynep Tufekci, assistant professor at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science (SILS), has been named an inaugural Andrew Carnegie Fellow by the Carnegie Corporation of New York for her proposal “Big Data and the Algorithmic Threat to Democracy and Civil Society.” The new annual fellowship program provides up to $200,000 to scholars, journalists, and public intellectuals in the humanities and social sciences who are pursuing research on the challenges facing U.S. democracy and international order in the next 25 years. Recipients are enabled to take a sabbatical of between one and two years to research and write.


Dr. Mary Grace Flaherty and MSLS student Faith Burns receive grant to develop "Read & Reach" program

(April 2015) UNC-Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science (SILS) assistant professor Mary Grace Flaherty and Master of Library Science (MSLS) student Faith Burns have received a $5,000 Carnegie-Whitney Grant from the American Library Association to develop “Read & Reach: A Resource for Promoting Physical Activity in Storytime Programs.” The project will provide children’s librarians across the United States with a comprehensive list of children’s books that encourage physical activity.


Dr. Jaime Arguello receives NSF award to study ways to make search results more effective and useful

(February 2015) Jaime Arguello, assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science (SILS), has received a National Science Foundation career award to support his research for the next five years on a project titled “Making Aggregated Search Results More Effective and Useful.”  Knowledge from the project will help improve search systems (such as Google or Bing) across different domains and develop tools that will enable other researchers to test their own solutions.


Dr. David Gotz named NCDS 2015 Data Fellow

(December 2014) The National Consortium for Data Science (NCDS) selected three faculty members at three different universities as NCDS Data Fellows for the 2015 calendar year. Each Data Fellow will receive $50,000 to support work that addresses data science research issues in novel and innovative ways. David Gotz, associate professor at the School of Information and Library Science at UNC-Chapel Hill and assistant director of the Carolina Health Informatics Program, received support for his project, “Visual Analytics for Large-scale Temporal Event Data.”


Three SILS faculty receive awards to support research

(December 2014) Robert Capra, Mary Grace Flaherty, and Mohammad Hossein Jarrahi, three assistant professors at the University of North Carolina’s School of Information and Library Science (SILS), have received UNC Junior Faculty Development Awards for 2015. Capra will use the award to investigate new approaches for helping search system users when they encounter difficulty finding information. Flaherty’s research project will make the Carolina Health Assessment Research Tool (CHART), an online health behavior assessment created by UNC researchers (http://chart.unc.edu), available to adult patrons at the Farmville Public Library (FPL), located in mid-eastern North Carolina. Jarrahi’s research project seeks to gain a broad understanding of mobile knowledge workers’ information practices and the role of the emergent digital infrastructures that they enact in the course of carrying out these practices.


Dr. Mohammad Jarrahi receives Kilgour research grant

(November 2014) Dr. Mohammad Jarrahi, assistant professor at the UNC School of Information and Library Science (SILS), has received an Eleanor M. and Frederick G. Kilgour Research Grant Award. The competitive grant awards were established in spring 2011 to support pilot projects that include preliminary work that could possibly lead to full research proposals to external agencies. Jarrahi’s current research, for which he has received a Kilgour Grant, is titled “Mobile Knowledge Professionals and Digital Infrastructures.”


Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant supports improving access to born-digital collections for collecting institutions

(October 2014) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science (SILS) has received a grant for $750,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for a project that focuses on simplifying and improving access to the contents of disk images in born-digital collections for use by libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs). The BitCurator Access project will develop open-source software that supports the provision of access to disk images through three exploratory approaches: (1) building tools to support web-based services, (2) enabling the export of file systems and associated metadata, (3) and the use of emulation environments. Also closely associated with these access goals is redaction. BitCurator Access will develop tools to redact files, file system metadata, and targeted bitstreams within disks or directories.


Adjunct professor Heather Gendron, professor Marciano and other UNC researchers receive grant to ensure future of artists’ archives in North Carolina

(April 2014) A grant of $491,908 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) will help a team of researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill prepare future librarians and archivists to identify, organize and care for the complex records of visual artists in North Carolina. The three-year grant is called “Learning from Artists’ Archives: Preparing Next Generation Art Information Professionals through Partnerships with North Carolina’s Artists’ Archives.”


Dr. Mary Grace Flaherty receives Kilgour grant to assess health resource use in North Carolina libraries

(August 2013) Dr. Mary Grace Flaherty has received an Eleanor M. and Frederick G. Kilgour Research Grant Award offered by the Universtiy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Information and Library (SILS). Flaherty's current research project, for which she received a Kilgour Grant, is titled, "Assessing Health Information Resource Use in NC Public Libraries." Flaherty will pose questions related to knowledge of resources for patron information on the "Affordable Care Act" (e.g. WebJunction resources), knowledge of resources from the National Library of Medicine and whether the library offers any programming related to health information and/or health promotion.


Dr. Javed Mostafa receives NIH grant to research "Meeting Clinicians' Information Needs . . ."

(June 2013) Dr. Javed Mostafa, professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a project titled, “Meeting Clinicians' Information Needs with Highly Tailored Knowledge Summaries.” The project will be a four-year long effort conducted with investigators from the Mayo Clinic and the University of Utah (School of Medicine). The focus will be on the visualization aspects, particularly on presenting the content extracted from diverse sources in an interactive display that is accurate, coherent and usable by a busy physician in the context of care.


Dr. Helen Tibbo receives IMLS grant for CRADLE Project

(May 2013) The Institute of Museum and Library Science (IMLS) has awarded Dr. Helen Tibbo a 2013 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant of nearly $500,000 for her project, “CRADLE: Curating Research Assets and Data using Lifecycle Education Data Management Education Tools for Content Creators, Librarians and Archivists.” The School of Information and Library Science (SILS), the Howard Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will collaborate on the project, which seeks to establish a comprehensive continuing learning program for librarians, archivists, information and library science students and data creators that focuses on issues of data management, preservation and archiving.


Jason Priem, SILS Ph.D. student, and co-PI Heather Piwowar, receive $125K grant to track the impact of scholarly work on the Web

(April 2012) Jason Priem, a third-year doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science (SILS), and Heather Piwowar, a postdoctoral research associate at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) in Durham, have been awarded a grant totaling $125,000 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for their Total-Impact Web application. Total-Impact is a project that allows users to view the impact of a wide range of research output via its Web site.


Digging Into Data challenge grant winners include SILS professor

(January 2012) Dr. Richard Marciano (PI) received a $175,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences (IMLS) as the lead investigator, along with Dr. Ray Larson (PI, University of California Berkeley) and Dr. Paul Watry (PI, University of Liverpool), of one of fourteen teams that won the second Digging into Data Challenge. The project addresses how "big data" can change the research landscape for the humanities and social sciences.


Dr. Sandra Hughes-Hassell receives grant for African-American youth literacy summit

(October 2011) Dr. Sandra Hughes-Hassell received a $99,074 National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services (IMLS) to organize a summit titled "Building a Bridge to Literacy for African-American Male Youth: A Call to Action for the Library Community." Hosted jointly by SILS and the School of Library and Information Science at North Carolina Central University, the summit "will unite national stakeholders, including members of the library and education community, researchers, educational policy makers, national organizations focused on the needs of African-American youth, publishers, and young black males, to focus on the role of school and public libraries in closing the literacy achievement gap of African-American male youth.”


Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant supports digital forensics work for collecting institutions

(October 2011) Dr. Christopher (Cal) Lee has received a grant for $600,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for a project that creates and analyzes systems for archivists, librarians, and other information professionals to incorporate the functionality of digital forensics methods and tools into their work. The BitCurator project will be a joint effort led by SILS and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland. MITH's Dr. Matthew Kirschenbaum is co-PI. 


Closing the Digital Curation Gap: An International Collaboration

(October 2011) Dr. Helen Tibbo, Principal Investigator (PI), and Dr. Christopher (Cal) Lee, co-PI received a $92,812 grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services (IMLS) that extends their "Closing the Digital Curation Gap (CDCG)" project. The CDCG project is "an International Collaboration to Integrate Best Practice, Research, Development, and Training in Digital Curation."


Grant extends Educating Stewards of the Public Information Infrastructure project

(June 2011) Dr. Helen Tibbo was awarded a grant for $897,449 in the category "Programs to Build Institutional Capacity" from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The grant is for the project, "Educating Stewards of the Public Information Infrastructure (ESOPI2)." The grant extends ESOPI-21 and provides funding for ten dual-degree students, providing each of them with both a Master of Library/Information Science degree and a Master of Public Administration degree and one Ph.D. student. Partners include the National Archives and Records Administration, Town of Chapel Hill and the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.